Why we need to hold employers accountable: one advocate’s story of abuse at a state hospital

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I work at a state mental health hospital. My position is in administration. I work making sure the hospital is in compliance with state and federal rules and regulations.

The bullying began early on. I was called names and threatened with being fired to the point I was told I was suspended and told to leave. I wasn’t suspended, and with the union’s help, I returned to work. Initially it started with public ridiculing and suggestions that this job was not a good fit. I was offered a severance bonus and a good reference if I quit, all of which was bogus. I was told I wasn’t allowed to speak to anyone and, if I did, it would get back to the boss — and it did. I would be discussing work, and the boss would follow up asking me why I was talking to so-so on this date and time.

(This job was what I had been working toward for a long time; the pay and the hours were good, and I was still in school with young kids. It was not a good time to switch jobs. I was hoping to put in a respectable amount of time and move on until I saw how truly hostile the environment was and how unhappy people were.)

I feel cheated; I was never given a chance to excel at the job because the boss kept changing the rules. The boss would ask for one thing then publicly degrade me that everything was wrong with random, nonsensical statements like “This doesn’t make sense!” The boss would rant and rave, asking questions but not allowing for answers.

I was not the first nor will I be the last; before me, the boss/bully did the same to another administrator. He eventually quit. I have witnessed this boss curse and make fun of people’s clothes and speech. Other administrators, a psychologist, a psychiatrist, and MDs witness the boss’ abusive erratic behavior and say nothing. I have heard screaming in the hallways: this boss targeting some poor soul. People shrug and return to their office.

It started as subtle hints and public taunts and moved on to ignoring and publicly snubbing: gossiping, complaining about nonsense, and telling people I am a bad parent. I was shut out of computer programs I needed to do my work. Then it graduated to name-calling and outright threats of being fired (both times behind closed doors).

The HR department refused to speak with me because I was in a union. The union has filed multiple grievances against this boss for more than 10 years for similar complaints up to and including blackmail. There have been court cases ordering reinstatements. The union admits that the hospital refuses to address this person’s behavior, so there is nothing they can do.

The first time the bullying occurred, I was still new. I figured I didn’t have a prayer, so I would just ride it out until I got fired. I needed the paycheck and experience. Everyone who witnessed the bullying and me come out the other side verbalized being impressed with my strength. My coworkers admitted to first thinking I would never survive and that from all the abuse they had witnessed except for one other, I gotten the worst of it. Coworkers told me stories going back ten years: what they witnessed and experienced from name calling to threats of physical abuse and lies.

After being reinstated, the boss/bully left me alone for a while. But it began again with ignoring me and canceling meetings. When we finally met, I was told that the plan was to get rid of me and that nothing would get in the way. The impact has been utter disbelief in the level of hostility and the number of licensed professionals who stood by and said nothing. Absolute helplessness and hopelessness at the possibility of moving on after such brazen abuse complains were escalated to the highest level of the department for years and nothing was done. Over and over again. Friends and family can’t believe what happens at this facility. And moreover that it is legal. I’m out on an extended leave due to the stress; I have three medical professionals recommending I not go back to such hostile environment for my health’s sake.

The overall impact on the hospital is that the bare minimum gets done. Morale is in the toilet. It always has been, I’ve been told. The turnover is high and continuous. Every new hire is told not to trust or speak to anyone — by the boss/bully all the way down. The boss/bully told me if I said anything to anyone, it would get back to them. Any and all questions only go to the boss. The boss’ admin and another worker make regular rounds and report everyone’s whereabouts and to whom they’re talking. No one is allowed to
discuss anything with anyone without checking in with the boss first, including the most mundane work-related topics.

Workplace bullying legislation is necessary for people to be able to work in a collaborative atmosphere toward agreed upon goals and not have to worry about personal agendas to threaten and demean others, regardless of class, color, race, etc..

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

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How administrators bullied a state hospital nurse after workplace violence

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I was a registered nurse at the a hospital in Worcester from 2014-2016. During that time, I was injured by a patient on the job. I had previously been involved in speaking out for patient safety and staff safety through our union, the Mass Nurses Association. We were highlighted in a news story by Fox 25 Boston’s Mike Beaudet on the unreasonable amount of violence occurring at the hospital and the leadership’s unwillingness to address the issue. After this, the bullying by the director of nursing, assistant director of nursing, and the worker’s compensation manager who was handling my claim became worse.

I was denied pay for about 4-5 weeks, with no reason given other than my documentation was insufficient (it was not). I retained an attorney who assisted me in navigating through the claims process, had two surgeries to correct the injury to my left knee, and am now left partially disabled. I was accused of ‘faking my injury’ so that I could ‘take time off for school’ (I had started an online masters program in nursing). I wasn’t allowed to interview for a job I applied for and was fully qualified to do. I was also blocked from leaving the hospital to go to a facility in Boston also run by the state. I was told that my assistant director of nursing told the Boston facility that I wasn’t interested in the job and was just kicking tires, which was not true.

While I was able to get the medical services I needed and the back pay I was owed, I never was able to address the bullying that occurred.

I ended up leaving for the private sector briefly and then returned to employment with the Commonwealth in September of 2017. I am happy with my new job and new facility, but I still think of the bullying every day. I needed a second surgery in 2017, which was approved by an administrative judge, and it was proven that I was in fact injured on the job as I said I was. Yet in December of 2017, I received a call from the worker’s compensation manager asking me if I “do this at every job I go to now just to get attention or money.” I was floored and didn’t know what to say. I couldn’t believe that someone whose job it is to handle injured workers claims would say this.

I am certain that I was bullied because I spoke out and seemed to threaten the “old guard,” the senior leadership team at the hospital.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

A bullied Commonwealth employee only received help from Unemployment

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I was employed by the Commonwealth as a BERS (Benefit, Enrollment, and Referral Social Worker) A/B from March-July 2015. My position was to process applications. I loved this job, and it was the best paying position I’d ever had.

At the beginning of June 2015, I was called in my manager’s office and asked, along with two other members of my team (both men), to help “shadow” new hires (provide them with help). I and one of the men expressed some doubt as to whether we were qualified, but our manager assured us that Quality Control had monitored our work.

I began helping new hires shortly afterward. They sat with me, and I coached them through the applications process. The first day I began doing this, the woman sitting next to me walked out and never came back. She angrily said to me “I think I should have been asked to do the shadowing.” I had considered this woman a friend of mine.  Another woman who sat diagonally across from me (I could stand up in my cubicle and touch her computer) abruptly stopped speaking to me and would not tell me why. I also considered this woman a friend. I bought a $20 Dunkin Donut gift card and wrote “if you would like to talk, I would like to listen,” and placed the gift card on her desk.

This woman walked over to me, put the gift card on my desk, and walked away without saying a word. She then loudly told the women sitting near her that I had “thrown” the gift card at her, and she was “not putting up with” my “attitude.”

I went to my manager and showed her the gift card and explained that the woman would not speak to me. My manager spoke with her, then told me “don’t approach her.  We’re going to let this blow over.”

My heart sank when my manager said “we’re going to let this blow over,” as I knew this would not do anything to help the situation. I stopped trying to speak to the woman, who then loudly began to talk about me in derogatory ways to the women sitting near her, i.e., “She doesn’t even know what she’s doing,” “She thinks she’s so great — she’s wearing a suit again,” “She never wears dresses — I think she’s a lesbian.” There were a few men on our team, and sometimes they would stop to talk to me. When this happened, the woman said “It’s disgusting. She flirts with every guy in here.”

I requested in writing to be moved to another team (we occupied four floors of the building, so I did not see this would be a problem). My manager would not allow me to do this.

I tried to call both HR and my union representative, who did not return my calls. Finally, I approached one of the women with whom the woman was loudly gossiping about me. This employee informed me that “some people” felt I was “not qualified to coach new hires.” Then this same woman said to me “and you don’t go running to management.”

I was shaken by this conversation and emailed my resignation to my manager at the end of that workday.

The Department of Unemployment approved my claim. The woman I spoke with there was the only person who listened to me. She assured me that she had read everything I had sent, including copies of my emails to my manager when the woman first began harassing me and a copy of my email requesting to be moved to another team.

I have not experienced anything so juvenile since I was in the seventh grade.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

An advocate shares her story of psychological intimidation

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Amy was bullied through interrogation and intimidation at a school outside Boston. She felt disrespected, attacked, blindsided, scared, uncomfortable, sick to her stomach, and threatened. Here’s her story in her words:

It started in February 2018. I was in the main office asking my principal a question, as he was handing out February vacation assignments to our custodians. One particular custodian was staring at me, and the principal had to get his attention by hitting him with the piece of paper and waving it at him while calling his name. I thought it was bizarre but didn’t think anything of it.

A couple minutes later, I left the main office. The custodian asked me if I would be in my office after school. It seemed odd because we have never really said more than a “hi” passing through the hallway.

He came to my office at 2:45pm while I was with a 4th grade student and said “I’ll come back.” At 3pm, he came in and asked me if I had plans over vacation and wanted to know if I wanted to hang out. I declined his offer and told him I was getting married in two months. I had told my assistant principal and co-counselor what had just occurred. They were both as shocked as I was.

About a month later, I arrived in my office, and there was a post-it on my computer screen with a smiley face on it. I showed my assistant principal, and he said that’s a guy’s handwriting and thought he might know who it is (both of us recalling the custodian who asked me on a date).

A week later, I arrived in my office and there was another post-it, this time a drawing of a flower with the same smiley face in the middle. I showed my assistant principal, and again he thought he knew who wrote it. He said he would talk to the custodian’s sister, a history teacher at another local K-8 school whom he worked with in the past.

Another week later, I arrived at school. I noticed some of the items on my desk were shifted and a drawing of a garden containing the same flowers with smiley faces in them. I immediately brought it to my assistant principal and told him that I was extremely uncomfortable and creeped out. (He kept all these pictures and post-its in his drawer.) He said he would speak to this particular custodian’s sister and make sure this stops.

I met with the assistant principal and principal and told them the situation. My principal told me he would speak to the custodian after school after I left the building.

A few days later, my principal came into my office and asked to come meet with him about the incidents that occurred. I entered our main office conference room and was greeted by the assistant superintendent, assistant principal, and principal.

I greeted them and sat down. The assistant superintendent asked if there was an issue with the custodian and asked me if I was telling people he asked me on a date. He said it was going all around the administration building and the schools. His demeanor and tone were completely inappropriate, acting like I did something wrong.

I told him the only people who knew what had gone on the past couple weeks were in the room and I hadn’t told anyone. The only other person who knew outside the room was my co-counselor, who was in our office suite when he came by.

His follow up question was “why does everyone at administration know about it and also other schools? People are talking about it.”

I asked “are you implying I’m telling people?”

He said “well everyone is talking about it, so I’d like to figure out where it’s coming from.” He never asked me if I was ok, what happened, or if I felt comfortable. All he cared about was who I told.

I responded saying I would like to know too since the only people who know are in this room. Then I mentioned the picture and post-its. I asked if he knew about the pictures.

His response was “WHAT PICTURES?”

The assistant principal got up and went to his office, returning with the post-its and picture and gave them to the assistant superintendent.

He asked if people knew about them. I said no one know except the people in this room and that even my own fiancé doesn’t know.

The meeting abruptly ended with him saying “I’d like to know how everyone knows he asked you on a date and I am going to get to the bottom of it.”

I responded with “me too.”

He was unprofessional, disrespectful, and out of line. His tone was not ok. He took his authority and position and used it against me, making me feel like I did something wrong when I was being harassed in my own work environment.

I later found out through my own investigation that he met with the custodian after me, and the custodian admitted to the actions.

My principal agreed his approach was not good and that he could have handled it differently. He even stated to our Human Resources employee “I informed him of what had occurred that Friday after school to make sure I followed the right protocol and to see if there was anything I needed to do.”

My principal checked in with me daily throughout the weeks to make sure I was ok. I said no. I wasn’t happy with the results. The assistant superintendent is supposed to be our TITLE IX Coordinator but he completely disregarded protocol and the law. I called my supervisor (who happens to be my principal’s sister and is the director of guidance). She’s also been checking in with me.

Meanwhile, the assistant superintendent showed up to my school weekly with no update, no apology, and no communication. He never followed up with me and was at the school weekly over the course of the end of the school year — 12 days I have a record of. His “friend” who was my secretary stopped talking to me, made the workplace uncomfortable, gave me yes or no answers, and, at times, wouldn’t even look at me when speaking with her.

I developed high anxiety and dreaded waking up to drive to work. I felt attacked and threatened. There was no apology given. I did what I felt was right. I told the people who I thought could help, but my issue got swept under the rug.

For the rest of the school year, I was sick to my stomach and upset about coming to work. My mind was completely consumed with this. I was uncomfortable in my position and felt unsafe in my own environment.. The custodian admitted everything and still works here, and I would go out of my way not to bump into him. Not once did the assistant superintendent check back in with me to make sure I was ok. Every time I would see him, I would immediately feel anxiety and rage.

I later found out that this custodian had asked out two other employees: one who is our building rep. She was recently widowed, and the custodian had sent her a Facebook message. She was stunned and told her friend at the school where his sister works. We figured out that assistant superintendent heard about HER DATE. It wasn’t even me, but he’d never met with that teacher to threaten HER. He also interrogated another teacher, who left the meeting in tears, not knowing what the assistant superintendent was talking about, and had to leave school for the day because she couldn’t pull herself together. The situation also made her feel uncomfortable and constantly on edge for the rest of the school year.

Our incidences was brushed under the rug along with others than happen behind closed doors.

Many people have mentioned the assistant superintendent has taken his new role as assistant superintendent to a new level. He was extremely unprofessional, out of line, and disrespectful for using the tactic of psychological intimidation.

Something needs to happen. This can’t happen and shouldn’t happen to anyone. People should feel comfortable coming to work and feel safe in their own environment.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

A corrections officer suffered from repeat bullying after domestic violence

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I was married to a coworker. We were both employed at a prison as corrections officers.
After we divorced, he broke in and held me hostage at gunpoint for 12 hours. He beat, raped, and sodomized me, then tried to kill me by choking me. He put the gun in my mouth and pulled the trigger. The gun jammed, and he panicked and fled the house.
Then he tried to kill himself by overdosing. The police found him hours later. He was arrested at the hospital after being treated.
After he was indicted for the crimes against me, I asked for a domestic violence transfer to another facility many miles away from him, as is the states policy on such matters.
Instead, they refused me, and I was bullied by coworkers who took his side.
Supposedly if you are convicted of a felony, you forfeit your pension. The state allowed him to retire and collect his pension while he was in prison.
Finally after being harassed repeatedly, I was moved to another facility — where the bullying was tenfold. The bullying was daily: name calling, threats, refusing to work with me, off -color jokes, and outright accusations of sleeping with captains and lieutenants who tried helping me. I kept reporting the bullying, and no one helped me or bothered to try.
My PTSD was getting worse— triggered by the bullying.
I went out on workers’ comp. I had my doctors verify my claim. Their doctors verified my claim. Independent doctors verified my claim. I filed for an early retirement based on my injuries. They separated me from service based on my injuries.
Five years later after repeated calling, writing, and begging for my accidental disability retirement, they still refused me.
I was forced to take out what meagre amount of money I had to avoid homelessness and now I have nothing. The state gets away with it. In March 2018, they forced me to write a letter saying that by taking out my pension, I waived my right to my accidental disability claim.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

“How could this happen to me?” asks a workplace bullying target

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I’ve always worked in office environments. Since 2009, I have been employed by a high-profile business. In 2014, I moved into a new area of the business. This was a really exciting time for me as I had landed in a great department, the department everyone wants to work in — so much so that it is almost glamourised. I was determined to learn the job quickly, I wanted to be an effective employee as soon as possible. I read and watched and learned. I was recognised very early on as having the potential to be an asset to the team.

I had an excellent record for producing written documentation to a high standard — a standard so high that management would often compliment my writing style in team meetings. As a result, I often had my colleagues ask me to proof their reports or ask for advice on how to structure their writing. I prided myself on being a mentor and a coach to others and loved to help others whenever I could. I have always enjoyed helping others.

I was recognised by upper management as being a fast learner and someone who could easily adapt to change. I am a perpetual learner by nature and in this role, there was always something new to learn so I relished in every opportunity I was given. I was provided with opportunities to work on different projects, lead teams, travel interstate, and provide support to others on technical matters. I coached, I mentored. I worked my heart out. I felt I belonged. I felt I had found my niche. I felt confident.

Also, I LOVED my job — I really did… and it was all going great until I got a new team leader in 2017.

For me, workplace bullying took the form of a slow, covert, passive-aggressive series of events that occurred over approximately 13 months. That’s right — the behavior of the bully in my story was so clever at manipulating situations that it took me that long to realise what was actually going on and how it had affected me in an extremely negative way.

Unfortunately, it did not end after 13 months. I will tell you about that shortly…

Despite having an outstanding history of being a high performer at work, I was slowly but surely made to look incompetent by this new leader. My history and reputation of being an excellent operator suddenly meant nothing, as I found myself being constantly reprimanded for matters that I had never had a problem with before, and aspects of my work that I had previously been commended for were now never good enough.

When I first joined her team in 2017, my new leader was aware of my good reputation and thought we would make a good team — that the future would be exciting and that she was very much looking forward to working with me. However, shortly after starting work under this new leader the following started to occur…

  • I was consistently asked to meet unrealistic deadlines — at first, I tried to keep up, thinking that I needed to prove myself.
  • I was thrown obstacles and distractions and was provided with constant “goal-post moving” that negated my progress and in turn led to missing those unrealistic deadlines.
  • I was subjected to overbearing supervision and monitoring.
  • In private conversations with my leader, I was subtly put down, made to feel stupid, and slowly but surely, I felt I was losing control. I started to believe that what the bully was telling me was true.
  • I was embarrassed and belittled in front of others.
  • I was provided with incorrect or misleading information and was often “led up the garden path” so to speak.
  • I was questioned as to whether I was even suitable for my job and ultimately, I was threatened with my job security and my career. Actually, I don’t have a career anymore — not that one anyway.

And that my friends, makes me very sad to say the least. Also, that really is the short version of events.

So, what happened to me physically and emotionally during these 13 months or so?

  • I started to become anxious at the mere thought of going to work.
  • The anxiety increased in severity to the point of daily panic attacks and manifested itself into symptoms of depression.
  • I experienced physical symptoms of stomach pain, shakiness in my hands and legs, nausea, and was often teary. There were days I would be sitting at my desk and the tears would just start to stream down my face. I knew that what I was experiencing was not normal — but I didn’t know what to do.
  • My self-confidence and self-esteem had plummeted.
  • I felt isolated, hopeless, and believed that I had somehow become bad at my job.
  • I hardly spoke to anyone at work anymore. Where I had once been a go-to person, a social person, a friendly face in the office that people liked to stop and chat to, I was now constantly at my desk with my head down. So full of shame and hardly even remembering the person I used to be, I just withdrew.
  • I questioned my own sanity, thought it was all in my head, and some days, I thought I was going crazy…

After I realised what had been going on, I was shocked and devastated that I had allowed this to happen — how could I allow it? Did I allow it? Did I allow this person to make me unwell?

The answer is actually, yes I did allow it — but by no means did I allow it willingly.

The fact is that the whole thing snuck up on me. I had no idea I was being bullied until it was way too late. The damage had already been done.

However, in the future, when I am working again, wherever that may be, there is no way that I will allow myself to ever be bullied again.

Being able to recognise the tactics and behaviors of a bully will allow me to put an immediate stop to them. I plan to arm myself with the knowledge and the tools to ensure that any potential bully is shut down way before they can identify me as a potential victim.

If you are being bullied at work or school or wherever you may be, right now, please keep reading. I hope to provide us both with all the ammunition we need to ensure that any potential bullying is stopped before it even starts.

However, after around 10 months of putting up with what I now know was workplace bullying, the penny dropped, and I started to document everything: every meeting, every conversation, every word. I diarised my dealings with the bully, and that is what I urge you to start doing immediately if you are in this situation right now.

Even after the penny dropped, I stuck around. I thought I could ‘fix’ things myself. However, the stress and anxiety I was experiencing was no match for what the bully had in store for me.

I tried the following things:

  • I worked harder. I tried to produce more work. That didn’t work. My work was never good enough.
  • I stood up to my bully. I told her that her behaviors had affected me in a negative way. That didn’t work. That made things worse — much worse….
  • I sought the advice of a workplace harassment “specialist.” That didn’t work. I received zero advice.

I was left no choice. I had to make a formal complaint so off I went to HR.

WELL — that was a good move (not). However, even in hindsight, I still see that I had no other option, and if I had to make that decision again — whether to report the bully to HR or not, I still see that I really had no other choice.

So the report was made but now what…? Well, I had to keep going to work. The stress was unbearable. How could they (HR, upper management) just leave me there, with the bully still in charge of me, knowing what she had done, knowing that I was suffering?

Welcome to the world of bureaucracy, people. I had to stick it out… but, I couldn’t. So, I went on sick leave. There were days where I tried to “suck it up” and just try to go to work, but still it was unbearable. HR were conducting their “investigation”— and they were taking a very.long.time.

After around six weeks of being on and off work (mostly off), I was advised by upper management to return to work, as my leader had been moved to another team, and I would receive a new team leader to work with. I was offered a fresh start, endless amounts of support. I felt as though I could go back to work… finally, I felt as though I had a small win.

However, I was not prepared for what happened next.

In an effort to protect the bully, the bullying had to continue — to prove I was indeed incompetent, to prove that bureaucracy could never fail an employee. To prove that the system in place is effective and there is no way that this business could be liable for my becoming unwell.

I went from being bullied by one to being bullied by a further three people. The people who assured me they wished only to support me in any way they could failed me.

The “support strategies” were endless. The “support strategies” were ineffective. They were just one big cover up, one big bunch of made-up, bureaucratic, inconsistent rubbish. Just rubbish.

My health deteriorated further as I tried to keep my head above water. However, I was drowning, and they kept pushing my head under that water. I was sure they were trying to kill me… not in a paranoid way but I knew they were just trying to push me over that edge. They wanted me gone. I was causing too much trouble for them and way too much paperwork. The more I tried to stick up for myself, the more they tried to shut me down, the more I felt I would most certainly drown.

Again, I had no choice. I left. I did not resign. I went on leave. Again, I had no choice….

So here I am, blogging about a horrific experience, an ineffective system and how I continue to fight this battle that has changed my life, that has changed ME, but I swear, it will not beat me….

 

Reprinted with permission from http://icourage.com.au/how-did-this-happen-to-me/

Why don’t workplace bullying targets matter? An advocate asks why nothing is being done

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I spend my days researching for anything to help me fight “city hall.” Today I came across this article: “Workplace bullying remains in the shadows.” While my story falls under many different terms, bullying it high on the list.

Per the EEOC, you HAVE to prove your harassment is due to race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, ancestry, or protected whistleblower status. How would someone know WHY they are being harassed/bullied? Yet to get any help under The Civil Right Act, a victim HAS to prove it was for a one of the reasons listed.

Huge corporations almost always have an ethics policy, and part of that policy is keeping employees in a safe work environment. If it is a public company, you have investors to be accountable to, too. Everyone from the CEO to the janitor has to adhere to that policy. In my case, we have to sign and acknowledge it. Yet, who is holding the company accountable for the ethical treatment of the employees by the company?

I have reached out to the CEO to notify him of the devastating harassment/bullying and unethical behavior. I even notified him that I have been diagnosed with C-PTSD and PTSD by two separate therapists. While he never responded directly, he did have his Chief Compliant Officer respond by threatening me to not contact anyone within the company.

Bullying is severe enough. We have foundations/organizations for kids. We have campaigns on TV. While we want to keeps kids safe, what about their parents? My job, my livelihood for 16 years, has been taken from me by a company of bullies in management positions, covering up for others’ unethical treatment.

When we can no longer provide for our families and have been mentally broken by bullies, it can and does lead to families destroyed. The employee either has to face it daily or, in my case, mentally break down and go on disability.

Some of us actually believed in that policy, the speeches, and the CEO to keep us safe.

Don’t we matter?

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?