Help Rhode Island move workplace abuse legislation forward

Workplace abuse legislation passed the Rhode Island Senate last month. On Wednesday, advocates testified in front of the House Labor Committee in support of House Bill 6087, which would establish a cause of action against employers and employees for workplace bullying, harassment, and other abusive conduct.

Rhode Island is the second state in the nation to pass their state’s Senate, and they need your help in getting the bill through the House so it can become the law of the land.


Email your workplace abuse story
to the House Labor Committee members
Draft your story in one page:
Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

Email your story to these legislators and ask them to move House Bill 6087 favorably out of committee:
rep-williams@rilegislature.govrep-mckiernan@rilegislature.govrep-fellela@rilegislature.govrep-alzate@rilegislature.govrep-blazejewski@rilegislature.govrep-casey@rilegislature.govrep-edwards@rilegislature.govrep-jackson@rilegislature.govrep-lyle@rilegislature.govrep-mcentee@rilegislature.govrep-mcnamara@rilegislature.govrep-messier@rilegislature.govrep-millea@rilegislature.govrep-newberry@rilegislature.govrep-noret@rilegislature.govrep-ucci@rilegislature.gov

Spread the word to others, especially friends and family in Rhode Island, to either share their stories or simply write to these legislators in support of the bill.

Testify to help move workplace abuse legislation forward in Rhode Island

Just weeks ago, the Rhode Island Senate passed workplace abuse legislation. We just got word the legislation, House Bill 6087, which would establish a cause of action against employers and employees for workplace bullying, harassment, and other abusive conduct, will go up in front of the House Labor Committee. Rhode Island is the second state in the nation to pass the full bill in the state’s Senate, and we need your help in getting the bill through the House so it can become the law of the land.

Hearing:
TODAY! Wednesday, May 22, 2019
4pm
Room 203 – State House


Share your workplace abuse story at the hearing
Draft your story in one page:
Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?
 

Dos and don’t of speaking at the hearing
DO speak about your experience. 
Speak from the heart about how workplace abuse affected you, especially how it harmed your health and affected your personal relationships. Remember that legislators want to hear from you.

DO keep your testimony to under two minutes. Stick to the facts and to your own experience and keep it brief. It’s difficult to summarize months or years of abuse into two minutes, but it’s important to do so.

DO stick to our talking points. Refresh yourself on the main points we want to get across:

  1. Accountability, not just training, is what will change behavior.
  2. There will be a high threshold for recovery.
  3. The bill is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s definition of a hostile work environment for sexual harassment.
  4. The bill enters the picture only when the abusive behaviors have become severe and harmful.
  5. Employers can minimize their liability exposure by acting preventively and responsively toward abuse.
  6. The bill focuses on addressing the abusive behavior, not killing jobs.
  7. Many workplace abuse targets already lose jobs, choosing their health over daily suffering.

DO visit your state rep and senator that day. Before or after the hearing, stop by your legislators’ offices and ask them to support the Healthy Workplace Bill. That’s one State Rep and one State Senator. Try to make an appointment with them beforehand. If you can only speak with an aide, do that. Aides will pass along information to legislators. The State House is hard to navigate, so write down the State House room numbers before that day, bring them with you, and don’t be afraid to ask someone how to get to those offices. Bring a copy of each of these fact sheets (two of each, one for each legislator) to leave with your legislators:
Fact sheet
Myths sheet

DO email this fact sheet to your legislators if you can’t make it that day. Your legislators want to hear from you.

DON’T mention abuser’s names or workplaces — unless asked. The goal is to pass the law, not to out a boss or workplace.

DON’T feel like you have to testify to show support. If you’re not ready to speak under two minutes about your experience, don’t feel obligated to speak. You may not be ready, and that’s ok. Showing your support by attending is much appreciated whether or not you speak.

About the bill
Workplace abuse legislation would allow targets of severe abuse at work — verbal abuse and sabotage, for example (think domestic abuse but at work) — to sue their employers. Finally, we’d hold employers accountable for abuse they generally ignore or make worse — and give them incentives to address it in the first place.

Because the worst of the transgressions already are illegal, lawmakers seem satisfied to call for culprits to be fired or to step down and for corporate and industry leaders to promise that they’ll crack down on offenders more quickly in the future. But legislators can do more to address the problem. They can make workplace bullying illegal. Too many corporate leaders find it expedient to look the other way when bosses — especially ones they deem indispensable — systematically intimidate and humiliate underlings. Bullies who believe that their whims matter more than other people’s dignity often don’t see why their sexual impulses shouldn’t be just as indulged.”
— LA Times’ David Lieberman


Sadly, those who suffer most from abuse of power are those not often in power: women and non-White workers, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI). It’s a loophole in the law that prevents those who don’t have power from ever getting it.The worst industries for abuse: education, healthcare, government, and other non-profits. 

Workplace abuse: the basics
Workplace abuse is a widespread problem. The WBI estimates that 60.4 million U.S. workers have been affected by it. That’s 1.5 times the population of California and four times more common than sexual harassment and racial discrimination at work.

Employees suffer:

  • They begin feeling demoralized after repeated attacks (false accusations, exclusion, withholding necessary resources, behind-the-back sabotage and defamation, put-downs, excessively harsh criticism, and unreasonably heavy work demands, for example) and start to doubt their ability to succeed at employment elsewhere.
  • After months and years of abuse, they can experience a host of stress-related health problems including anxiety, depression, high blood pressure, heart palpitations, migraines, fatigue, muscle pain, and digestive issues.
  • They’re forced to choose between their health and a paycheck and health insurance.
  • Some lose their entire careers, giving up their investments in education.
  • They feel isolated after their family and friends feel unable to help, leading to suicidal thoughts.

Organizations suffer, too. With increased absences (including sick leave), turnover, errors, and presenteeism (showing up but checking out) and decreased productivity and morale, organizations’ bottom lines deteriorate, making them less competitive.

We have environmental regulations to limit environmental risks but few regulations for employee well-being. We have occupational health and safety laws calling for reports on workplace accidents and deaths. We uphold building codes, put down wet floor signs, and routinely inspect equipment — all physical protections. But we don’t mention the human impact of emotional and mental abuse. So we leave employee health up to our CEOs, who too often ignore damage to their employees. We don’t leave environmental pollution and occupational health and safety up to CEOs. So why do we leave employee health up to CEOs — when CEOs too often lead in ways that serve neither the employees nor their bottom lines?

Other countries have laws that address workplace abuse, including Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, Sweden, France, and Denmark. The United States remains last among western democracies to have no anti-abuse laws for the general workforce.


Another way you can help
We need as many people as possible to contact your own state legislators and ask them to move Senate Bill 90/House Bill 6087 forward. Legislators care most about what their own constituents want so they can get re-elected, so calling and emailing your own state legislators is the most effective way to move the bill forward.

Put pressure on committee members to move workplace abuse legislation forward

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We think we’ll have a hearing date before July, and it looks like we’ll get about two weeks notice for the hearing date. If you’d like to testify, prep your story now.

In the meantime, let’s put pressure on members of the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development. Last session, this bill sat with this committee for about eight months before it moved forward, leaving little time to move the bill through the rest of the session. This session, we can put pressure on the committee members, especially Senate Chair Pat Jehlen of Medford, Somerville, Cambridge wards 9 to 11, and Winchester, precincts 4 to 7 (Patricia.Jehlen@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1578 (aide: Mark Martinez, mark.martinez@masenate.gov)). We can educate her on the nuances of the bill.

Legislators care most about what their own constituents want so they can get re-elected, so we ask you to meet with your legislator if he or she is on this committee (members are listed below). If you can’t meet with your legislator:

  1. Call your own legislator if he or she is on the list below. Tell whoever answers the phone “I’m calling to ask _____ to move Senate Bill 1072, an act addressing workplace bullying, mobbing, and harassment, without regard to protected class status, through the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development. The lead sponsor is Senator Paul Feeney.” They may ask you your name and address.
  2. Followup with an email. Tell the legislator why you want him or her to help move Senate Bill 1072 forward and why you want the bill to pass. Include links to these flyers to explain the bill and the full text of the bill:
    http://www.mahealthyworkplace.com/MAWorkplaceBullyingFactSheet.pdf
    http://www.mahealthyworkplace.com/MAWorkplaceBullyingFactSheet3.pdf
    LA Times article: “To end sexual harassment on the job, end workplace bullying” 
    https://malegislature.gov/Bills/191/S1072/
  3. Ask others who live in their districts to do the same. (Find out if someone is in a legislator’s district.)


Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development

Senate Members:

CHAIR: Senator Patricia Jehlen (D-Somerville)Patricia.Jehlen@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1578 (aide: Mark Martinez, mark.martinez@masenate.gov)
VICE CHAIR: Senator Jason Lewis (D-Melrose)Jason.Lewis@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1206
Senator Sal DiDomenico (D-Everett)Sal.DiDomenico@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1650
Senator John Keenan (D-Quincy)John.Keenan@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1494
Senator Michael O. Moore (D-Worcester)Michael.Moore@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1485
Senator Patrick O’Connor (R-Scituate)Patrick.OConnor@masenate.gov, (617) 722-1646

House Members:
CHAIR: Rep. Paul Brodeur (D-Melrose)Paul.Brodeur@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2013
VICE CHAIR: Rep. Stephan Hay (D-Fitchburg)Stephan.Hay@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2220
Rep. John Barrett III (D-Adams)john.barrett@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2305
Rep. Gerard Cassidy (D-Brockton)Gerard.Cassidy@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2396
Rep. William Crocker (R-Barnstable)William.Crocker@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2014
Rep. Jim Hawkins (D-Attleboro)james.hawkins@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2013
Rep. Liz Malia (D-Boston)Liz.Malia@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2380
Rep. Joseph McKenna (R-Douglas)joseph.mckenna@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2060
Rep. David Allen Robertson (D-Wilmington)david.robertson@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2210
Rep. Steve Ultrino (D-Malden)Steven.Ultrino@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2460
Rep. Susannah Whipps (I-Athol)Susannah.Whipps@mahouse.gov, (617) 722-2090

If you live in Senate President Karen Spilka’s district (Ashland), we ask you to do the same:
Senator Karen Spilka (D-Ashland), Karen.Spilka@masenate.gov, 617-722-1500

Prepping for our hearing to make severe workplace abuse illegal

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

While we don’t yet have a scheduled date for the hearing yet, the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development will hear our testimony in support of Senate Bill 1072 (the Healthy Workplace Bill) at the Massachusetts State House sometime in the next couple months. You are invited to attend the hearing, to ask others to help fill the room, and even testify to show support. 

At the hearing, legislators listen to testimony about several bills. In previous sessions, legislators waited until the end of the hours-long hearings to listen to testimony from our advocates. We encourage you to speak at the end on behalf of the bill.

We’ll let you know as soon as we know the date of the hearing.

Dos and don’ts of speaking at the hearing

DO speak about your experience. Speak from the heart about how workplace abuse affected you, especially how it harmed your health and affected your personal relationships. Remember that legislators want to hear from you.

DO keep your testimony to under two minutes. By the end of the hours-long hearing, legislators may be tired. The last thing we want to do is turn them off, so stick to the facts and to your own experience and keep it brief. It’s difficult to summarize months or years of abuse into two minutes, but it’s important to do so.

DO stick to our talking points. Refresh yourself on the main points we want to get across:

  1. Accountability, not just training, is what will change behavior.
  2. There will be a high threshold for recovery.
  3. The bill is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s definition of a hostile work environment for sexual harassment.
  4. The bill enters the picture only when the bullying behaviors have become severe and harmful.
  5. Employers can minimize their liability exposure by acting preventively and responsively toward bullying.
  6. The bill focuses on addressing the bullying behavior, not killing jobs.
  7. Many workplace bullying targets already lose jobs, choosing their health over daily suffering.

DO visit your state rep and senator that day. Before or after the hearing, stop by your legislators’ offices and ask them to support the Healthy Workplace Bill. That’s one State Rep and one State Senator. Try to make an appointment with them beforehand. If you can only speak with an aide, do that. Aides will pass along information to legislators. The State House is hard to navigate, so write down the State House room numbers before that day, bring them with you, and don’t be afraid to ask someone how to get to those offices. Bring a copy of each of these fact sheets (two of each, one for each legislator) to leave with your legislators:
Fact sheet
Myths sheet

DO email these fact sheets to your legislators if you can’t make it that day. Your legislators want to hear from you.

DON’T mention bully’s names or workplaces — unless asked. The goal is to pass the law, not to out a boss or workplace.

DON’T feel like you have to testify to show support. If you’re not ready to speak under two minutes about your experience, don’t feel obligated to speak. You may not be ready, and that’s ok. Showing your support by attending is much appreciated whether or not you speak.


Remember that perseverance is key. Most bills take years to pass, and we’ve come a long way with just 20 advocates six years ago to now more than 16,000.

Help become part of history by showing your support and helping to fill the room that day.

A lawyer makes the case for workplace abuse legislation

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My name is Rebecca Dupras (@redupras). I am a resident of Rhode Island and I currently practice law here. I recently spoke on the passage of the Healthy Workplace Act. Though my experience did not take place in Rhode Island, these types of incidents are happening everywhere in our country. My experience occurred while working for the Silicon Valley Community Foundation in California and Georgetown University in Washington, DC, and is well documented in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, The New York Times, and Forbes Magazine.

During my time as a Vice President of Development at this charitable foundation, where I managed a team of 10-15 people, I was subjected to consistent harassment, manipulation, and threats by my supervisor. She worked at the organization for over a decade, and I was not her only victim. She would threaten violence towards coworkers, humiliate and embarrass me and others during meetings and in front of other staff, say sexually explicit things, and even once made an overt anti-Semitic comment in front of me and my staff. Her unpredictable and hostile disposition caused me to be on edge, which constantly put me in a defensive posture. As a manager, it was very difficult to manage a team and work in an organization with extremely high turnover and high burnout because of this person’s behavior. She was essentially the second in command, and the CEO of the organization was made aware of her behavior on numerous occasions from myself and from others. He took no action when it came to my specific concerns about my supervisor and was mostly dismissive. He also exhibited hostility towards me when I tried to push back against policies and ideas that were not in alignment with his constant desire to grow the organization despite a complete disregard for the suffering human capital. I ended up with the same fruitless results from Human Resources as well, being told on multiple occasions that I needed to put up with the culture or leave.

Eventually, with no help from the organization, I contacted a lawyer to try to bring an action under the federal laws that guard against discrimination in the workplace but was told that unless I could prove that she was doing this to me basically daily as a result of my race, ethnicity, gender, etc., I would likely not prevail in an attempt to bring an action against the company. I could not bring this cause of action because she was just a bully, someone who felt powerful while perpetually intimidating and minimizing those around them.

My experience at Georgetown University was not as dramatic but was similar in that my supervisor decided I was a threat to her and she did everything in her power to cause me to leave. She would lie to colleagues about me, give me written instructions and then tell me I did not do something that she never instructed me to do, and lie to Human Resources about me. I attempted to go to her supervisor and Human Resources again, but because she brought in money to the organization, I had to leave. She has yet to retain a staff person, except for one who is in constant fear of her, for more than one year.

A law such as the Healthy Workplace Act would have permitted me to bring an action against either or both of these bullies directly for the behavior that led to, in the first instance, me leaving a job that I truly loved and thrived in. It also led to me seek treatment, both through therapy and medication, to manage the fallout from what I had to endure while at these jobs.

I understand that this is a difficult concept for anyone who has not experienced this. It was hard for me to understand even while it was happening since I had never gone through an experience like this before. I had worked in law firms most of my career and put myself through night school and the evening program at Suffolk University Law School. I was used to fast-paced, challenging environments and working hard.

These environments were different, however. No matter how hard I worked or what I did to please these supervisors, I was never going to be able to prevent the behavior because it was never about me. Both felt the most powerful when they were putting other people down, and I am left with residual trauma and distress from the relentless manipulation.

When my story went public, I realized that I was not alone. Strangers contacted me to tell me their stories on social media, face-to-face, and at conferences. So many people, even in the world of philanthropy, where I thought people were trying to do the common good, are suffering and feel isolated by this behavior.

I understand that there is concern that this legislation will cause a burden to the business community. I know that business, especially small business, is the heart of Rhode Island’s economy. But I also know that workers and a thriving workforce are the key to having a successful and thriving business economy. A person with a full-time job spends about a quarter of their week at work if not more. That time should be valued — and protected.

This bill gives Rhode Island an opportunity to set itself apart as being a place where we value workers and the dignity of work. Where people can feel safe and protected at work from supervisors as well as coworkers, which leads to better home life and better communities. Where people can thrive at their jobs and participate without fear. There are so many studies that prove that providing a healthy and safe workplace leads to better productivity and less turnover which leads to consistency and continuity in the workplace. This legislation will show workers in Rhode Island that they are valued, which will lead to a better, more productive and stronger workforce. We all want to feel supported and enabled to do our best, not surrounded by people who set us up — or want us to fail.

Many of you likely have children or grandchildren or nieces and nephews who, if they were being bullied at school, you would probably be the first to say something to try to stop that behavior. Why are we so passionate about protecting kids from such volatile behavior, but not adults? We know that being bullied can lead to a multitude of physical and mental health problems, difficulty with focus and learning, and in some cases even suicide. To me, especially after what I experienced, I cannot see much difference in the outcomes, which is what leads me to passionately discuss this problem locally and nationally.

I feel that this bill will be another step in the right direction for Rhode Island to show that we care about our people and we value and dignify the workforce.

The key to advocating for healthy workplaces

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A few years into my advocacy for workplace abuse legislation, I co-led a small business. I quickly realized that knowing what not to do didn’t necessarily translate well into what to do. What were best practices for bringing out the best in employees? How could I work to help workers feel fulfilled and strong? What did I need to gain self-awareness of to prevent a toxic culture? These questions led me to dive into what it took to create a healthy workplace.

The toxic culture
In his book The Bully’s Trap, Andrew Faas dissects the cultures that lead to abuse in the first place. He says that in toxic cultures, employers see employees as expendable. When employers consider workers a means to an end rather than associates, that’s exploitation. Here are some key factors in a toxic culture:

  • Higher-ups are out of touch. They focus on short-term results at the expense of long-term performance. They focus on power to bring about those short-term results. Power is addictive, and fear fuels power. (Fear is a substitute for motivation.)
  • Managers aren’t transparent. They enforce few checks and balances, advance employees using subjective and ambiguous standards, and condone lax ethical standards.
  • Employees don’t respect management. They’re consumed with fear, hate, and retaliation. They fingerpoint to protect themselves rather than address problems or go the extra mile. They operate in survival mode.
  • Managers who say they uphold dignity and respect but don’t back it up are seen as hypocrites. Employees notice.
  • Those who remain suffer from depression, anxiety, and burnout.
  • The more targets push back, the more determined management is to get rid of them. It’s about power, not facts.

Two types of toxic cultures
Faas further breaks toxic cultures down into two types: dictatorial and disjointed.

  • In dictatorial cultures, blind obedience is expected around a hierarchy. Managers don’t treat employees like humans, including leaving them out of decision-making and collaboration. Unethical activities are the norm, and managers blame and punish employees when things go wrong or employees blow the whistle to keep them in line.
  • In disjointed cultures, managers are weak and passive. They aren’t aligned to purpose, values, and vision. There’s little structure, discipline, rule enforcement, motivation, and expectations. Managers don’t consistently enforce rules but instead react. They cover up wrongdoings and discredit others.

The stable culture
Contrast the toxic culture with the stable culture, where:

  • There’s a common and well-understood vision, purpose, and long-term plan.
  • Managers use compassion to lead rather than fear.
  • Leaders consistently apply rules and clearly define roles, responsibilities, and accountability.
  • Managers values teams over individuals.
  • Managers model respect, honesty, and open communication.
  • Managers talk through goals in regular conversations where managers treat subordinates more like customers, asking subordinates what they need from them.
  • Employees aren’t afraid to experiment with new ideas.
  • Managers dampen rather than amplify power and pay differentials. They realize there’s a pecking order but downplay it as much as possible.
  • Leaders mix in with employees as they work and ask questions about how they can make things better for them.
  • Leaders forbid extreme internal competition.
  • Because of the high level of transparency, there’s no fear of retaliation from whistleblowing or mistakes (which are learning opportunities).
  • Leaders make it easy to switch internal teams so they can figure out which managers aren’t treating team members right.
  • Leaders know what abuse looks like (because everyone in the organization knows what it looks like) and hold abusers accountable for their behaviors.

Devaluation is the intentional process of making you feel so very small so that they can feel big.

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So how do these ideas apply to advocacy?
It’s easy to fall into patterns of creating hierarchies through power grabs: preaching, dictating, ignoring, stealing credit, controlling, and positioning oneself as the one who has the answers, for example.

Yet according to Faas’ research, working well with others is at its root about respecting others’ needs and our own. It’s about collaborating and supporting each other. It’s about understanding that greatness calls for us to all acknowledge our power and our strengths and weaknesses — and that of others — and to use that confidence and awareness to advance the cause.

With the issue of workplace abuse, these values are even more important. The culture we create within our own advocacy is as important as the cultures we’re working to create and encourage.

We’re all responsible for upholding human dignity right now, in the moment.

A nurse’s aid suffers from health issues after refusing to lie on the job

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I relocated my family to Western Massaschusetts to start a new life. I decided to go for CNA training and was hired immediately at a state facility as a 3-11 nurse’s aid.

I am a quiet, keep-to-myself type of person, and for the first seven years had no issues. One afternoon, two coworkers working in my unit got into a verbal altercation just as the PTs returned to the unit after dinner. The two coworkers were quite loud, and another woman and I helped get the PTs back to their rooms so they were not exposed to the yelling. I truly was not paying attention to the altercation — that’s not my job.

A little later, the 3-11 supervisor approached me and asked me what happened. I explained that I wasn’t paying attention to them and that my concern was for the PTs. She took me to the activities room and dictated to me what to write in a statement then left, locking the door behind her. I grew up with words of wisdom from my mom to never do anything immoral or illegal and I was not going to lie to get anyone fired. So I wrote down that I didn’t really see what happened and that I was busy caring for my PTs.

In the meantime, an activities staff member using a key came in, asked what I was doing, and stated she “saw nothing” in regards to my being locked in the room. I was fearful to leave until she came back.

The supervisor was not happy with what I wrote down. I could tell by the look on her face. Then she nitpicked. I could do nothing right in her eyes. She pulled me into her office at least once a shift to discuss things with me, such as not making myself available to help other staff members quickly enough, not having conversations with another coworker that weren’t work-related, not answering call bells fast enough even though there were five other staff members on unit, and little mistakes made on paperwork, among other things.

Every time she came on unit, she scowled at me and made me feel uncomfortable to the point where I began having severe anxiety and panic attacks. I was taken out of work two times by ambulance because my blood pressure was so high, and I couldn’t stop shaking. I even began to feel suicidal and sought help through employee health. I sought out counseling and a psychiatrist and tried to get workers comp until I felt better and got on a different shift. The ER doctor said if I didn’t change the situation, the panic attacks would become heart attacks.

I was denied workers comp. They said it had to be a physical issue — not a psychological one. I had to fight it. I was transferred to another shift and heard a lot of whispering behind my back. The 3-11 supervisor began coming in early onto my unit to speak to one of the nurses. I felt extremely intimidated and anxious again, so I resigned due to health issues. I applied for unemployment only to be turned down because my former employer said I quit. I had to fight that, too. I also lost out on being vested for State retirement because I left just shy of my 10 years.

I felt like as long as I was on that supervisor’s good side, all was fine. But when I would not be her puppet and lie for her, I became her next target. I still suffer from major depressive disorder stemming from the way I was treated.


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?