Category: Uncategorized

A corrections officer suffered from repeat bullying after domestic violence

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I was married to a coworker. We were both employed at a prison as corrections officers.
After we divorced, he broke in and held me hostage at gunpoint for 12 hours. He beat, raped, and sodomized me, then tried to kill me by choking me. He put the gun in my mouth and pulled the trigger. The gun jammed, and he panicked and fled the house.
Then he tried to kill himself by overdosing. The police found him hours later. He was arrested at the hospital after being treated.
After he was indicted for the crimes against me, I asked for a domestic violence transfer to another facility many miles away from him, as is the states policy on such matters.
Instead, they refused me, and I was bullied by coworkers who took his side.
Supposedly if you are convicted of a felony, you forfeit your pension. The state allowed him to retire and collect his pension while he was in prison.
Finally after being harassed repeatedly, I was moved to another facility — where the bullying was tenfold. The bullying was daily: name calling, threats, refusing to work with me, off -color jokes, and outright accusations of sleeping with captains and lieutenants who tried helping me. I kept reporting the bullying, and no one helped me or bothered to try.
My PTSD was getting worse— triggered by the bullying.
I went out on workers’ comp. I had my doctors verify my claim. Their doctors verified my claim. Independent doctors verified my claim. I filed for an early retirement based on my injuries. They separated me from service based on my injuries.
Five years later after repeated calling, writing, and begging for my accidental disability retirement, they still refused me.
I was forced to take out what meagre amount of money I had to avoid homelessness and now I have nothing. The state gets away with it. In March 2018, they forced me to write a letter saying that by taking out my pension, I waived my right to my accidental disability claim.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

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“How could this happen to me?” asks a workplace bullying target

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I’ve always worked in office environments. Since 2009, I have been employed by a high-profile business. In 2014, I moved into a new area of the business. This was a really exciting time for me as I had landed in a great department, the department everyone wants to work in — so much so that it is almost glamourised. I was determined to learn the job quickly, I wanted to be an effective employee as soon as possible. I read and watched and learned. I was recognised very early on as having the potential to be an asset to the team.

I had an excellent record for producing written documentation to a high standard — a standard so high that management would often compliment my writing style in team meetings. As a result, I often had my colleagues ask me to proof their reports or ask for advice on how to structure their writing. I prided myself on being a mentor and a coach to others and loved to help others whenever I could. I have always enjoyed helping others.

I was recognised by upper management as being a fast learner and someone who could easily adapt to change. I am a perpetual learner by nature and in this role, there was always something new to learn so I relished in every opportunity I was given. I was provided with opportunities to work on different projects, lead teams, travel interstate, and provide support to others on technical matters. I coached, I mentored. I worked my heart out. I felt I belonged. I felt I had found my niche. I felt confident.

Also, I LOVED my job — I really did… and it was all going great until I got a new team leader in 2017.

For me, workplace bullying took the form of a slow, covert, passive-aggressive series of events that occurred over approximately 13 months. That’s right — the behavior of the bully in my story was so clever at manipulating situations that it took me that long to realise what was actually going on and how it had affected me in an extremely negative way.

Unfortunately, it did not end after 13 months. I will tell you about that shortly…

Despite having an outstanding history of being a high performer at work, I was slowly but surely made to look incompetent by this new leader. My history and reputation of being an excellent operator suddenly meant nothing, as I found myself being constantly reprimanded for matters that I had never had a problem with before, and aspects of my work that I had previously been commended for were now never good enough.

When I first joined her team in 2017, my new leader was aware of my good reputation and thought we would make a good team — that the future would be exciting and that she was very much looking forward to working with me. However, shortly after starting work under this new leader the following started to occur…

  • I was consistently asked to meet unrealistic deadlines — at first, I tried to keep up, thinking that I needed to prove myself.
  • I was thrown obstacles and distractions and was provided with constant “goal-post moving” that negated my progress and in turn led to missing those unrealistic deadlines.
  • I was subjected to overbearing supervision and monitoring.
  • In private conversations with my leader, I was subtly put down, made to feel stupid, and slowly but surely, I felt I was losing control. I started to believe that what the bully was telling me was true.
  • I was embarrassed and belittled in front of others.
  • I was provided with incorrect or misleading information and was often “led up the garden path” so to speak.
  • I was questioned as to whether I was even suitable for my job and ultimately, I was threatened with my job security and my career. Actually, I don’t have a career anymore — not that one anyway.

And that my friends, makes me very sad to say the least. Also, that really is the short version of events.

So, what happened to me physically and emotionally during these 13 months or so?

  • I started to become anxious at the mere thought of going to work.
  • The anxiety increased in severity to the point of daily panic attacks and manifested itself into symptoms of depression.
  • I experienced physical symptoms of stomach pain, shakiness in my hands and legs, nausea, and was often teary. There were days I would be sitting at my desk and the tears would just start to stream down my face. I knew that what I was experiencing was not normal — but I didn’t know what to do.
  • My self-confidence and self-esteem had plummeted.
  • I felt isolated, hopeless, and believed that I had somehow become bad at my job.
  • I hardly spoke to anyone at work anymore. Where I had once been a go-to person, a social person, a friendly face in the office that people liked to stop and chat to, I was now constantly at my desk with my head down. So full of shame and hardly even remembering the person I used to be, I just withdrew.
  • I questioned my own sanity, thought it was all in my head, and some days, I thought I was going crazy…

After I realised what had been going on, I was shocked and devastated that I had allowed this to happen — how could I allow it? Did I allow it? Did I allow this person to make me unwell?

The answer is actually, yes I did allow it — but by no means did I allow it willingly.

The fact is that the whole thing snuck up on me. I had no idea I was being bullied until it was way too late. The damage had already been done.

However, in the future, when I am working again, wherever that may be, there is no way that I will allow myself to ever be bullied again.

Being able to recognise the tactics and behaviors of a bully will allow me to put an immediate stop to them. I plan to arm myself with the knowledge and the tools to ensure that any potential bully is shut down way before they can identify me as a potential victim.

If you are being bullied at work or school or wherever you may be, right now, please keep reading. I hope to provide us both with all the ammunition we need to ensure that any potential bullying is stopped before it even starts.

However, after around 10 months of putting up with what I now know was workplace bullying, the penny dropped, and I started to document everything: every meeting, every conversation, every word. I diarised my dealings with the bully, and that is what I urge you to start doing immediately if you are in this situation right now.

Even after the penny dropped, I stuck around. I thought I could ‘fix’ things myself. However, the stress and anxiety I was experiencing was no match for what the bully had in store for me.

I tried the following things:

  • I worked harder. I tried to produce more work. That didn’t work. My work was never good enough.
  • I stood up to my bully. I told her that her behaviors had affected me in a negative way. That didn’t work. That made things worse — much worse….
  • I sought the advice of a workplace harassment “specialist.” That didn’t work. I received zero advice.

I was left no choice. I had to make a formal complaint so off I went to HR.

WELL — that was a good move (not). However, even in hindsight, I still see that I had no other option, and if I had to make that decision again — whether to report the bully to HR or not, I still see that I really had no other choice.

So the report was made but now what…? Well, I had to keep going to work. The stress was unbearable. How could they (HR, upper management) just leave me there, with the bully still in charge of me, knowing what she had done, knowing that I was suffering?

Welcome to the world of bureaucracy, people. I had to stick it out… but, I couldn’t. So, I went on sick leave. There were days where I tried to “suck it up” and just try to go to work, but still it was unbearable. HR were conducting their “investigation”— and they were taking a very.long.time.

After around six weeks of being on and off work (mostly off), I was advised by upper management to return to work, as my leader had been moved to another team, and I would receive a new team leader to work with. I was offered a fresh start, endless amounts of support. I felt as though I could go back to work… finally, I felt as though I had a small win.

However, I was not prepared for what happened next.

In an effort to protect the bully, the bullying had to continue — to prove I was indeed incompetent, to prove that bureaucracy could never fail an employee. To prove that the system in place is effective and there is no way that this business could be liable for my becoming unwell.

I went from being bullied by one to being bullied by a further three people. The people who assured me they wished only to support me in any way they could failed me.

The “support strategies” were endless. The “support strategies” were ineffective. They were just one big cover up, one big bunch of made-up, bureaucratic, inconsistent rubbish. Just rubbish.

My health deteriorated further as I tried to keep my head above water. However, I was drowning, and they kept pushing my head under that water. I was sure they were trying to kill me… not in a paranoid way but I knew they were just trying to push me over that edge. They wanted me gone. I was causing too much trouble for them and way too much paperwork. The more I tried to stick up for myself, the more they tried to shut me down, the more I felt I would most certainly drown.

Again, I had no choice. I left. I did not resign. I went on leave. Again, I had no choice….

So here I am, blogging about a horrific experience, an ineffective system and how I continue to fight this battle that has changed my life, that has changed ME, but I swear, it will not beat me….

 

Reprinted with permission from http://icourage.com.au/how-did-this-happen-to-me/

Why don’t workplace bullying targets matter? An advocate asks why nothing is being done

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I spend my days researching for anything to help me fight “city hall.” Today I came across this article: “Workplace bullying remains in the shadows.” While my story falls under many different terms, bullying it high on the list.

Per the EEOC, you HAVE to prove your harassment is due to race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, ancestry, or protected whistleblower status. How would someone know WHY they are being harassed/bullied? Yet to get any help under The Civil Right Act, a victim HAS to prove it was for a one of the reasons listed.

Huge corporations almost always have an ethics policy, and part of that policy is keeping employees in a safe work environment. If it is a public company, you have investors to be accountable to, too. Everyone from the CEO to the janitor has to adhere to that policy. In my case, we have to sign and acknowledge it. Yet, who is holding the company accountable for the ethical treatment of the employees by the company?

I have reached out to the CEO to notify him of the devastating harassment/bullying and unethical behavior. I even notified him that I have been diagnosed with C-PTSD and PTSD by two separate therapists. While he never responded directly, he did have his Chief Compliant Officer respond by threatening me to not contact anyone within the company.

Bullying is severe enough. We have foundations/organizations for kids. We have campaigns on TV. While we want to keeps kids safe, what about their parents? My job, my livelihood for 16 years, has been taken from me by a company of bullies in management positions, covering up for others’ unethical treatment.

When we can no longer provide for our families and have been mentally broken by bullies, it can and does lead to families destroyed. The employee either has to face it daily or, in my case, mentally break down and go on disability.

Some of us actually believed in that policy, the speeches, and the CEO to keep us safe.

Don’t we matter?

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

A Commonwealth employee waits for consequences for her workplace bully almost a year later

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I had worked in state government for about 18 years after having graduated from Boston College with a BS and an MBA from Bentley College.

I had been given a supervisory role within an IT group. Three months later, my director got transferred to another group, and another employee got promoted to be the director of my group.

I thought it was just a personality conflict at first. He started subtly criticizing everything I would do. He made me doubt my ability to do my job. He would ask me to do research, and then when I approached for clarification, he would say he didn’t tell me to do that. He would dictate how I supervised my team of 11 people and insisted on approving every request for vacation. Although I wrote out the performance appraisals for my team, he would not allow me to give the grades I thought were deserved. I was not allowed to put that anyone “exceeded expectations,” only “meets expectations,” even though I disagreed that some deserved the higher comment. In August of 2016, I received “exceeded expectations” on my own performance appraisal from him.

During this time, I began to realize that I was not the only person that my boss was “rubbing the wrong way” and that he was violating the bullying clause of union’s collective bargaining agreement. I met with some others in the group, and we decided we were going to complain about him. Having never had any friction with anyone else in
my 18 years in the job, we did not know the process, so I contacted an admin I trusted, and she set up a meeting with HR. Five of us met with HR, and notes were taken.

Five days after this meeting — and one month after having received an excellent performance appraisal — I met with my boss for a weekly check-in. He told me that he was considering a change and removing me from my supervisory position and placing me back as a team member. Oh, and I was also to trade my office for a cubicle as well after this demotion.

After doing some research, I filed a retaliation charge and agreed to mediation. The
employer’s representation immediately agreed to return me to my supervisory position if I wanted. But I did not want to work for the same boss. I wanted to transfer. There was an open position within the state that I had already noticed. I was able to transfer directly into that job within almost two months. My former boss was able to stay in his position, and I was concerned that the perception amongst colleagues was that I was demoted or did something wrong in some way. Why would anyone else ever lodge a complaint if they see that I got transferred out of the group while the perpetrator stayed in his position?

Shortly after transferring to my new team, I was contacted by HR to share my story as part of an investigation into my former boss because another complaint was filed against him. Three of us decided to compose a letter to the head of the division and outline the fact that there have been several complaints against this boss as well as several people who had transferred to different groups to get away.

Before sending this letter to the division head, it came to light that this exact situation happened in 2004-5 with an investigation into my former boss. A colleague who was working under him at that time contacted a bunch of people from back then, and
several written complaints surfaced. Several people during 2004-5 wrote out complaints about my former boss similar to those complaints from the current team including one letter to the Lt. Governor at the time. We included all of these complaints with our
letter to the division head.

Upon receipt of the letter, the division head assigned two people to investigate. This was September of 2017. They interviewed us and several other people, and another grievance was filed against my former boss as the investigation continued. It closed at the end of January 2018, with the investigators making some recommendations as to what should be done.

The investigation concluded at the end of January 2018 and as of the end of August 2018, the Commonwealth is refusing to produce the findings of the report. We are working with the union to file an Unfair Labor Practice complaint to force them to produce the report.

I am lucky because I have transferred out, but I have colleagues and friends who still work for him. I am fighting for them and others who may find themselves in a similar circumstance.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

A former state employee says “you don’t believe workplace bullying exists until it happens to you”

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I was a 33-year Commonwealth employee who was bullied and driven to suicidal ideation, panic attacks, and gastric problems. I would grind my teeth in stressful situations and cracked a molar. I spent a night in the hospital for stress-associated illness. I was prescribed anti anxiety and anti depressive meds and had a gastric ulcer. I spent time sobbing in the ladies room. I nearly was killed on the highway after taking too many anxiety meds prescribed to me because I just couldn’t take the stress.

I wrote a book, published in 2015, related to my work. The new administration where I worked warned me not to write the book after previous administration gave me permission.

I was harassed with letters from my agency’s lawyers sent to my house, threatened with termination, and had disciplinary letters placed in my file containing statements that weren’t true. Every day I suffered some form of bullying and gaslighting. I incurred an industrial accident that was documented but not acknowledged.

Hearing impaired, I filed complaints with MCAD. My well-documented case was thrown out. I was an exemplary employee up until the administrative change in 2013 (also documented).

I am an author and have published five books, one in the academic genre and several journal articles.

I was able to get into another agency, as I had certification as a peer counselor, which saved my life. I was highly regarded in the new agency as I was in the previous agency prior to the administrative change. I was an exemplary employee who always overachieved. I designed and developed innovative programs that were on the cutting edge.

When I went to my new agency, my state employee file was mysteriously “lost.” It was difficult to get my seniority from my previous agency transferred to my new one, and I was nearly laid off during a privatization of my worksite. With my seniority, I was able to transfer to a hospital, where I was highly regarded and was up for promotion. My file was eventually located — in my previous agency — although they stated to my new agency that they did not previously have it. Files just don’t get lost in Boston.

I retired in January 2018. My 35+ year career as a state employee included positions such as program director, public relations, building manager, volunteer coordinator, and counselor.

During all of the bullying, I was awarded an honor from the House of Representatives for “hard work and dedication to public service.”

I was nearly a casualty. You don’t believe it can happen until it happens to you.

Please, for God’s sake, stop the bullying.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?

An advocate asks: who’s holding companies accountable?

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My son was two years old when I was a temp for a company. It was near to impossible to get hired. I impressed HR so much that within two months, I was officially a full-time employee. For 16 years, I worked as a scheduler for one of the top 30 companies on Fortune 500. For 14 of those years, I was considered an above average or exceptional employee. I was an employee who always stepped up when a new project was on the horizon.

In March 2015, I was TOLD to perform a task that was unethical and against company policy and procedures by a newer member of HR. My company has mandatory training for the Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy. Every employee must sign agreeing to comply. Along with my own integrity and ethics, I refused the instructions and adhered to what I had signed. The decision to follow my companies’ policies was the beginning of the most mentally, emotionally, and financially devastating years of my life.

To cover up the mistake and lack of knowledge by HR, I was escorted off of my company’s property. The level of humiliation as I was forced to walk past my office building was overwhelming. I was only allowed to return by signing a discipline letter acknowledging an investigation was done. I went to my supervisor to show all policies and procedures in order have the false discipline letter removed. I did everything by the book, going up the chain of command, to no avail. A month later, I received an email from HR employee stating “I was correct”. Again, I asked to have letter removed, to no avail.

It was evident that I was being targeted. It started getting more stressful once the HR employee wanted to supervise the schedulers. As a direct report, I started to experience harassment/bullying daily. It ranged from being berated for hours behind closed doors to being singled out for my attire in front of my peers. Every day I would come into my office, I had to let my supervisor know I was there. I started to hate going into my office.

I made a formal complaint to her supervisor, the HR manager. On several occasions, I asked for some type of help to stop the bullying and berating by my supervisor. I made complaints to the Ethic Hotline. The company investigator did nothing. I continued to beg for relief to the HR manager, who did nothing. The more I asked for help, the more bullying was done. The HR manager was now telling me I wasn’t to speak to the local company manger. It became a war ground, and I realized that no one was going to stop it. I worked in HR, and THEY allowed the behavior. HR generally gives the training on ethics and ensures employees are behaving in accordance to the Companies Code of Conduct. They’re the department you are instructed to go to if you’re harassed. HR was not only allowing it. They were the bullies, the harassers, and the employees not adhering to the policies.

It finally broke me when I was told to either do as I am told or be terminated. I sat in my vehicle in hysterics for four hours unable to move. I called the company’s Employee Assistance Program as I couldn’t take the hostile and toxic environment anymore. That day I had thoughts of suicide. I couldn’t understand why this was happening or why my company was allowing it to happen. I started seeing a company-approved therapist who would send monthly updates of my status.

In the two years since that day, the bullying and coverup of the unethical behavior didn’t stop. I received FMLA letters stating my job was being filled, only to find out two months later that the letter was fabricated as I had been FMLA protected. I was denied on returning to work. I then reached out to Executive Board Employee for assistance as well as the corporate HR manager, the person who oversees ALL HR mangers. I requested a face-to-face meeting to eliminate any confusion. His response was to deny me a bonus and give me a non-performing review. I reached out to the CEO and sent him documentation that showed I had adhered to company polices and was being harassed and bullied daily. The Chief Compliant Officer threatened me to not contact anyone within the company again.

Here I sit alone, still an employee but not allowed to contact my employer and denied any form of income. I am an employee who was diagnosed by two separate therapists with C-PTSD and PTSD, a diagnosis that everyone from the local HR manager to the CEO was aware of and continued to not acknowledge along with the unethical treatment and mental abuse from the bullying and harassment. I have experienced nightmares, insomnia, depression, hostility, hopelessness, weight gain, financial devastation, and foreclosure of my home. I have lost my self-esteem and confidence and don’t go out in public due to shame. The legal definition of murder it the taking of one’s life. It doesn’t define life as physical. My life has been taken — emotionally, mentally, and financially. My employer has no less than committed murder.

A bully is defined as a person who uses strength or power to harm or intimidate those who are weaker. A synonym to bully is a tormenter. A tormenter is defined as someone who inflicts severe mental or physical suffering on someone. Then harassment is defined as aggressive pressure or intimidation. Bullying is much more severe. How is it that we have laws that forbid someone being harassed at work due to protected class but no laws for someone bullied? Per the EEOC, you MUST prove it is due to race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, ancestry, or protected whistleblower status. How would someone know WHY they are being harassed or bullied? Yet to get any help under The Civil Rights Act, a victim HAS to prove it was for one of the reasons listed.

Huge corporations almost always have an Ethics Policy, and part of that policy is keeping employees in a safe work environment. Then the public companies have investors, SEC, etc. to be accountable to, too. Yet who is holding the company accountable for the ethical treatment of the employees by the company?

Bullying is a severe enough epidemic that we have foundations/organizations for kids. We have campaigns on TV. While we want to keep kids safe and from harming themselves, what about their parents? Neither kids nor adults know why they have become a target. Kids and adults feel the same emotions. The only difference is that the adult has not one place to turn for help.  My job, my livelihood for 16 years, has been taken from me by a company of bullies who are in management positions, covering up for one another and their unethical behavior. When we can no longer provide for our families and have been mentally broken by bullies, it can lead to families destroyed. The employee either must face it daily or, in my case, mentally break down and go on disability. Some of us actually believed in our companies’ policy, the speeches, and the CEO to keep us safe.

The employees who are victims of bullying all share identifiable traits. Many studies and surveys have been done, and those traits are “skilled,” “hardworking,” “truthful,” “very competent,” “intelligent,” “professional,” and “ethical.” These are the people we are not protecting? How is that even possible? Shouldn’t these be traits that Americans and employers find valuable? In 2017, according to the EEOC reports, there were a total of 340,332 worker complaints. Also in 2017, per a Workplace Bullying Institute survey, there were 15 MILLION workers who experienced bullying and 4.35 MILLION who contemplated suicide. There are more people who are NOT protected because they can’t tell anyone the reasons why they are being bullied and abused. Just because a victim of a bully doesn’t know the reason for the abuse shouldn’t make the abuse acceptable.

Legislation needs to protect EVERYONE. Attorneys won’t take cases against companies unless they have one of those “reasons,” at least not on a contingency. Then when you don’t have income to pay an attorney, where does that leave you?

My life has forever been changed by bullying. Even though I am an American citizen who should be protected by The Civil Rights Act, I am not. Would government act if they woke up and found out that every citizen living in New Hampshire, Delaware, Rhode Island, and Vermont had committed suicide? If action would be taken to ensure that that many lives were not lost, then action needs to be taken to protect those bullied in the workplace as there are more people who have contemplated suicide in 2017 due to workplace bullying than who live in those four states.

I would like to be able to give advice to anyone else who is a victim of workplace bullying. I have read many articles, and most say to document, document, document.  That doesn’t matter. I have an 8-inch binder of documentation including policies, procedures, and admissions of guilt.  Yet no one helps. I have contacted all the government offices, state-elected officials, and the Health and Labor Board, and NO ONE will help.

The only thing that will make a difference is for a law to be put in place to assist.

We shouldn’t have our lives devastated because of bullies. We shouldn’t have to give up good-paying jobs for relief.

One advocate’s experience of workplace mobbing

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I am being tagged for being myself.
The managers are aware of what is going on but say nothing.
They seem to get a kick out of it because I guess they expect me, being Black, to get up in their faces, swear, and knock someone out so they can get rid of me — or worse, locked up.
There was a layoff in June 2016, and my previous co-worker retired. Four months before she retired, the managers claimed there was no money but were able to hire and hide positions that were open and available. They did not share them with current employees. The director of the department claims “he hid the positions in case staff were laid off.”  So they re-hired this manipulative man who worked in another department. He now sits behind me.
From day one, we did not get along because he was friends with two other trouble-making men who I did not get along with and had an encounter with. From that day on, they would laugh at and talk about me.
They’ve spent 30 years doing the minimum, gossiping, and making others’ lives miserable. They hate to see anyone smiling and enjoying themselves. This co-worker is devious, manipulative, and immature. They go along to get along. All of the employees know what is going on but are afraid to get involved so that they will not be targeted — or they just don’t care because it’s not them on the receiving end. Some of them join in.
I would like to catch them on camera to show others that they should not go along with what is wrong.
The issue is that I mind my business. I observed who not to be around and who to and they don’t like that. I do not go to work looking for trouble or want any trouble to come my way because I’m being me.
This has been going on for at least several years. Enough is enough.

The word “bullying” should not be given power because bullies are cowards — insecure individuals reflecting their lack of insufficiency onto other strong individuals who they only hope they could be.

 


Share your workplace bullying story. Email to info@mahealthyworkplace.com in one page along with an optional photo:

Where did you work and what did you do?
How did the bullying begin? What tactics were used?
How did you feel?
How did it escalate?
How did your employer react (or not react)?
What was the impact on you?
What was the impact on the organization?
Why do you want workplace bullying legislation to pass?
What advice do you have for others going through bullying at work?