How we deal with Harvey Weinstein’s world, the culture of abuse of power

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We’ve all seen our Facebook feeds flood with #metoo after the Harvey Weinstein allegations spread, showing the sad culture of sexual harassment and sexual assault far too many women (and some men) have endured. It’s a culture most of these sufferers have had to tolerate to succeed “because this entire town [culture] is built on the ugly principals that Harvey takes to a horrific extreme,” says Krista Vernoff, who co-runs ABC’s Grey’s Anatomy (HollywoodReporter.com).

“If I didn’t work with people whose behavior I find reprehensible, I wouldn’t have a career…. We work within this culture so we can amass some power so we can have a voice. And those who don’t do that — those who shout and scream ‘this is not OK’ when they feel threatened or belittled (those women who DID speak out against Harvey BEFORE the New York Times piece) — they largely live on the fringes of this town. They don’t get the power. They don’t get the platform that the mainstream provides,” she says.

But there’s another side of the story so many of us have lived through — that few talk about. Once it came out that Harvey Weinstein’s assistants would disappear once he made his targets feel safe, leaving him alone to harass and assault, one former assistant spoke up. “She and other women at his company were also victims of Weinstein’s abuse – regularly exploited and manipulated, leaving some severely traumatized,” according to the Guardian. Female employees “were not willing collaborators and had also suffered through verbal abuse, vicious threats, and intimidation.”

“You think you’re going to get this illustrious career. You really want to believe you are going to succeed. He preys on this. He preys on young, vulnerable people he can manipulate…. You’re trapped. You’re tired. You’re vulnerable. He starts breaking you down. It just spirals out of control the minute you start to realize what’s going on. You start to feel like you’re going insane.”
— One of Weinstein’s former employees

Basically, his employee claims Weinstein is a serial abuser, and she lived in fear that he’d ruin her career if she pushed back, leaving her feeling isolated and powerless.

It’s all #toofamiliar.

They aren’t just fears of retaliation and isolation so many experience at work (though more than 85 percent of those harassed at work don’t ever report it according to the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission (EEOC)). Retaliation and isolation are actually the norm. “Employers predominantly did nothing and actually retaliated against the target in 71 percent of cases who dared to report it,” says the Workplace Bullying Institute’s Gary and Ruth Namie in their book The Bully At Work.

Why So Many Workplaces Go Unchecked

We’re talking here about a culture that’s complicit — a culture where too many want to speak up but fear retaliation and loss of their jobs and careers. The highly competent, highly ethical workers assume everyone else has the same mindset as them until they encounter the less competent, less ethical power abusers who climb the ladder and use their power to serve their egos (rather than their organizations — what they’re getting paid for). It’s a clash of two opposing worldviews.

Those in power tolerate it. They don’t understand how power abusers create cultures where the best employees have less reason to care, so absenteeism and turnover go up, and productivity and innovation go down — along with their potential bottom lines.

How we change the culture

Step one in changing the culture was sexual harassment law. If you speak with women who worked before the law improved the culture, they’ll tell you how much safer workplaces are now for women.

Step two will be passing the workplace anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill to reduce the number of unsafe workplaces where workplace abuse is tolerated.

As we learned from #metoo, the culture of abuse still exists even with laws to protect us from abuse. But the collective voices saying enough is enough resulted in the #HowIWillChange response, putting the responsibility for change on those in power.

So here’s step three. Even with accountability through law, the responsibility will fall with those in power. It’s about those in power “being willing to stand up and say they won’t tolerate this,” says Amy Oppenheimer, an attorney who specializes in workplace harassment cases according to Bustle.com reporter Lauren Holter. It will fall on the shoulders of business owners and leaders all the way up the ladder to create healthy cultures and judges to enforce the Healthy Workplace Bill once it passes.

It’s time to blow our whistles even louder. It’s time to hold employers accountable. Enough is enough.

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An effective and easy way to reach your state legislators about making workplace bullying illegal

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Posting about the workplace anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill, Senate Bill 1013, on state legislators’ Facebook pages has proven extremely effective because of the public nature of it. (Legislators see your posts directly without your messages getting buried and want to be publicly responsive to get votes in their re-elections.)

So we need your help.

Post on your own legislators’ walls if they haven’t yet supported the bill (or post on all of their walls if you’d like — many will respond in this case even if you’re not in their districts, and others will learn about the bill, too).

Let’s get a buzz going in the State House.

Get everything you need to make this process easy »

Live near a college campus? Spread the word about workplace bullying.

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Lately we’ve heard from numerous former college and university employees about the abuse they endured on the job and the fear of speaking up from the employees left behind. Higher education is a breeding ground for workplace bullying for numerous reasons including:

  • Institutions don’t have to care about good management. When tuition rolls in regardless of how ineffective management is (similar to tax dollars in government), poor leadership doesn’t affect a college or university’s bottom line like it would a for-profit business.
  • There are many do-gooders. People who love power and control — bullies — love industries full of do-gooders, people who care about the organization’s mission and do good work in a cooperative way. Bullies see an opportunity to manipulate and serve their egos. It’s no surprise then that bullying is so common in schools, hospitals, and non-profits.

While many employees in higher ed suffer in silence, they can still feel validated and help pass legislation behind the scenes.

Help get the word out about the bill. Flyer campuses throughout Massachusetts before winter hits.

Download the flyer »
(If you look for it later, you can find it on our website.)

A police officer’s story of workplace abuse. And she needs our help.

Brenda

Officer James became a police officer in 1994. She passed a civil service exam, became a recruit, worked hard in the police academy, and then proudly became a police officer, a woman embarking on a male-dominated, dangerous career. A single parent, her then six-year old daughter made her promise to come home to her safe and sound. Officer James understood her obligation to her daughter and her commitment to the career she chose. Her district was changing, becoming more inclusive and diverse. The police department adopted a different model of policing: “Community Policing.” They wanted to develop partnerships and have better relationships with all community members. Officer James was one of the officers assigned to carry out that mission. She was recognized for the work she did as a community service officer and then became a juvenile officer. She was a liaison between the police department and community – school officials, clergy, business-owners, social service agencies, and programs. She was involved in roundtable discussions, interventions, mediation, individual educational plans for students at risk, court advocacy for juvenile delinquents, and relationship building with probation. She grew both personally and professionally by becoming certified to mediate and earning a masters degree in criminal justice from Boston University.

According to Officer James, she worked full duty for six months after erroneously being charged with Absent Without Leave (AWOL) in November 2011, with two months of her wages taken without any written notice while rehabilitating an approved, job-related injury. In June 2012, her commander showed up on her night shift at 1am (his shift begins at 8:00 am) to suspend her for an erroneous charge of being AWOL while out on an approved, job related injury (later expunged from her record). After being told it would be a one-way conversation, her commander attempted to engage in conversation with her with no union representative present. Her commander ordered her to turnover her equipment in his office, and she was compliant per her training. While safely removing the loaded firearm from her retention holster, on the gun belt she wore attached to her and with out any verbal warning to her or my shift lieutenant, the commander wrangled the gun out of the retention holster. After the suspension was served, she filed a required Incident Report (later approved and categorized as Sexual Assault for possible purposes of concealment). There was no proper response to this incident. She felt unsafe and afraid of retaliation of any kind, left in limbo with no status, no police identification, and not charged with abandonment of her job or being AWOL. The suspension was rescinded, and the AWOL was expunged from her record.

What’s happened since

One year later:
• After being put in numerous processes, she was eventually given 11 charges including untruthfulness and filing a false-report. 11 charges but NOT FIRED.
• An Investigation started for a rule violation that she was not officially accused of until July 2013.
• She was not allowed to take her annual drug test and was then charged with refusing.
• Two charges were added to the 11 charges. 13 charges but NOT FIRED.

Two years later:
• She was medically cleared to return to work.
• She remained in limbo for nearly three months.
• A doctor cleared her for light duty. She never worked a shift.
• She was put on Administrative Leave with Pay after being in limbo.

Three years later:
• Officer James was fired through a notice of termination placed in the hallway of a family member.

Officer James needs our support. Join us at Suffolk Superior Court, 3 Pemberton Square, Room 916, Boston, MA on Tuesday, October 17, 2017 at 2pm.

#MyNameIsOfficerJames

6 major ways to honor National Bullying Prevention Month

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Passing law to hold workplace bullies accountable starts with each of us. Here are six ways to jump in to make change for National Bullying Prevention Month:

Tell your story. Your stories help build awareness about the issue and the bill. They provide a way for people to connect with the cause on a human level. And they move people to act. If you’re willing to come forward with your story, separately email the following Boston-based reporters with it (keep it brief — to one paragraph initially — and stick to the facts of what happened and how it harmed your health and wallet) and explain that workplace anti-bullying legislation, Senate Bill 1013, is sitting in the State House but may have helped you in your case:
Jamie Ducharme (Boston Magazine): jducharme@bostonmagazine.com
Jenna Russell (Boston Globe): jenna.russell@globe.com
Bella English (Boston Globe): english@globe.com
Katie Johnston (Boston Globe): kjohnston@globe.com
Kristin Toussaint (Boston Metro): kristintoussaint@gmail.com
(If you email us your story at info@mahealthyworkplace.com, we can share it, too. And if your story gets published, email a link to us.)

Contact Attorney General Maura Healey’s office and ask her (or whoever answers the phone) to officially support the Healthy Workplace Bill, Senate Bill 1013. Her phone and email: (617) 727-2200ago@state.ma.us

Make phone calls to those in Massachusetts most likely to be bullied. It’s easy, flexible, and so satisfying to tell someone who’s been bullied about the bill. We even have a brief tutorial on how it works. Email us at info@mahealthyworkplace.com if you’re interested in making phone calls. Every call helps.

Call your state legislators. The single most important action you can take is meeting with or calling your State Rep and State Senator. Since they have local office hours, you don’t have to drive into Boston. Find your legislators.

Post on social media if your State Rep and/or State Senator hasn’t yet expressed official support for the bill. Legislators want your vote, and you want them to take action on issues you care about. Look up your state legislators. If they don’t support the bill (find out who does support the bill), politely let your social circle know on social media and tag your legislators. We need to hold them accountable.

Carry fact sheets with you in case the topic comes up. Share info with people who you talk about workplace bullying with (and email this info to family, friends, and colleagues).

Action Alert: Tell your legislators you want workplace anti-bullying legislation

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This session, these state legislators have not yet expressed official support for the workplace anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill (Senate Bill 1013, supported by 90% of the population). If your State Rep and/or Senator is on this list (find them here), call them to see if they support the bill. If they do, email us at info@mahealthyworkplace.com. Please share.

Rep. Aaron M. Michlewitz (D-North End, Boston)
Rep. Adrian Madaro (D-East Boston, Boston)
Rep. Alan Silvia (D-Fall River)
Rep. Angelo D’Emilia (R-Bridgewater)
Rep. Angelo Scaccia (D-Readville, Hyde Park, Boston)
Rep. Antonio Cabral (D-New Bedford)
Rep. Bradford Hill (R-Ipswich)
Rep. Bradley Jones, Jr. (R-North Reading)
Rep. Brian Murray (D-Milford)
Rep. Bud Williams (D-Springfield)
Rep. Carlos Gonzalez (D-Springfield)
Rep. Carmine Gentile (D-Sudbury)
Rep. Carole Fiola (D-Fall River)
Rep. Carolyn Dykema (D-Holliston)
Rep. Christine Barber (D-Somerville)
Rep. Christopher Markey (D-Dartmouth)
Rep. Chynah Tyler (D-Roxbury, Boston)
Rep. Colleen Garry (D-Dracut)
Rep. Cory Atkins (D-Concord)
Rep. Dan Cahill (D-Lynn)
Rep. Dan Cullinane (D-Dorchester, Boston)
Rep. Dan Ryan (D-Charlestown, Boston)
Rep. Daniel Hunt (D-Savin Hill, Dorchester, Boston)
Rep. Dave Rogers (D-Cambridge)
Rep. David DeCoste (R-Norwell)
Rep. David Linsky (D-Natick)
Rep. David Muradian (R-Grafton)
Rep. David Nangle (D-Lowell)
Rep. Denise Garlick (D-Needham)
Rep. Donald Wong (R-Saugus)
Rep. Edward F. Coppinger (D-West Roxbury, Boston)
Rep. Elizabeth Poirier (R-North Attleborough)
Rep. Evandro Carvalho (D-Uphams Corner, Dorchester, Boston)
Rep. F. Jay Barrows (R-Mansfield)
Rep. Frank A. Moran (D-Lawrence)
Rep. Geoff Diehl (R-Whitman)
Rep. Gerry Cassidy (D-Brockton)
Rep. Hannah Kane (R-Shrewsbury)
Rep. Harold Naughton, Jr. (D-Clinton)
Rep. Jack Patrick Lewis (D-Ashland)
Rep. James Cantwell (D-Marshfield)
Rep. James J. Dwyer (D-Woburn)
Rep. James J. Lyons, Jr. (R-Andover)
Rep. James Kelcourse (R-Amesbury)
Rep. James Miceli (D-Wilmington)
Rep. James Murphy (D-Weymouth)
Rep. Jay Livingstone (D-Back Bay, Boston)
Rep. Jay R. Kaufman (D-Lexington)
Rep. Jeffrey N. Roy (D-Franklin)
Rep. Jeffrey Sanchez (D-Jamaica Plain, Boston)
Rep. Jennifer Benson (D-Lunenburg)
Rep. Jerry Parisella (D-Beverly)
Rep. Joan Meschino (D-Hull)
Rep. Joe McGonagle (D-Everett)
Rep. John H. Rogers (D-Norwood)
Rep. John J. Lawn (D-Watertown)
Rep. Jose Tosado (D-Springfield)
Rep. Joseph D. McKenna (R-Webster)
Rep. Joseph Wagner (D-Chicopee)
Rep. Josh S. Cutler (D-Duxbury)
Rep. Juana Matias (D-Lawrence)
Rep. Kate Campanale (R-Leicester)
Rep. Kate Hogan (D-Stow)
Rep. Kay Khan (D-Newton)
Rep. Keiko Orrall (R-Lakeville)
Rep. Ken Gordon (D-Bedford)
Rep. Kimberly Ferguson (R-Holden)
Rep. Leonard Mirra (R-West Newbury)
Rep. Linda Dean Campbell (D-Methuen)
Rep. Liz Malia (D-Jamaica Plain, Boston)
Rep. Marc Lombardo (R-Billerica)
Rep. Marjorie Decker (D-Cambridge)
Rep. Mark Cusack (D-Braintree)
Rep. Mary Keefe (D-Worcester)
Rep. Matt Muratore (R-Plymouth)
Rep. Michael Day (D-Stoneham)
Rep. Michael Finn (D-West Springfield)
Rep. Michael Moran (D-Brighton, Boston)
Rep. Michelle DuBois (D-Brockton)
Rep. Mike Connolly (D-Cambridge)
Rep. Natalie Higgins (D-Leominster)
Rep. Nicholas Boldyga (R-Southwick)
Rep. Nick Collins (D-South Boston, Boston)
Rep. Patricia Haddad (D-Somerset)
Rep. Paul Donato (D-Medford)
Rep. Paul Frost (R-Auburn)
Rep. Paul Heroux (D-Attleboro)
Rep. Paul Mark (D-Peru)
Rep. Paul Schmid (D-Westport)
Rep. Paul Tucker (D-Salem)
Rep. Peter Durant (R-Spencer)
Rep. Peter Kocot (D-Northampton)
Rep. Rady Mom (D-Lowell)
Rep. Randy Hunt (R-Sandwich)
Rep. Robert DeLeo (D-Winthrop)
Rep. Robert Koczera (D-New Bedford)
Rep. Ronald Mariano (D-Quincy)
Rep. Sarah Peake (D-Provincetown)
Rep. Sean Garballey (D-Arlington)
Rep. Shaunna O’Connell (R-Taunton)
Rep. Shawn Dooley (R-Norfolk)
Rep. Sheila Harrington (R-Groton)
Rep. Stephan Hay (D-Fitchburg)
Rep. Stephen Kulik (D-Worthington)
Rep. Steve Howitt (R-Seekonk)
Rep. Susan Williams Gifford (R-Wareham)
Rep. Susannah Whipps Lee (Unenrolled-Athol)
Rep. Theodore C. Speliotis (D-Danvers)
Rep. Thomas Calter (D-Kingston)
Rep. Thomas Golden, Jr. (D-Lowell)
Rep. Thomas Petrolati (D-Ludlow)
Rep. Thomas Stanley (D-Waltham)
Rep. Thomas Walsh (D-Peabody)
Rep. Tim Whelan (R-Brewster)
Rep. Todd Smola (R-Palmer)
Rep. Tricia Farley-Bouvier (D-Pittsfield)
Rep. William C. Galvin (D-Canton)
Rep. William Driscoll Jr. (D-Milton)
Rep. William L. Crocker, Jr. (R-Barnstable)
Rep. William M. Straus (D-Mattapoisett)
Rep. William Smitty Pignatelli (D-Lenox)

Senator Adam G. Hinds (D-Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden)
Senator Anne Gobi (D-Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Middlesex)
Senator Bruce Tarr (R-1st Essex and Middlesex)
Senator Cindy Friedman (D-4th Middlesex)
Senator Cynthia Stone Creem (D-1st Middlesex and Norfolk)
Senator Donald Humason, Jr. (R-2nd Hampden and Hampshire)
Senator Eileen Donoghue (D-1st Middlesex)
Senator Eric Lesser (D-1st Hampden and Hampshire)
Senator Harriette Chandler (D-1st Worcester)
Senator James T. Welch (D-Hampden)
Senator Jason Lewis (D-5th Middlesex)
Senator John Keenan (D-Norfolk and Plymouth)
Senator Joseph A. Boncore (D-1st Suffolk and Middlesex)
Senator Julian Cyr (D-Cape and Islands)
Senator Karen Spilka (D-2nd Middlesex and Norfolk)
Senator Kathleen O’Connor Ives (D-1st Essex)
Senator Linda Dorcena Forry (D-1st Suffolk)
Senator Marc Pacheco (D-1st Plymouth and Bristol)
Senator Mark Montigny (D-2nd Bristol and Plymouth)
Senator Michael F. Rush (D-Norfolk and Suffolk)
Senator Michael J. Barrett (D-3rd Middlesex)
Senator Michael Rodrigues (D-1st Bristol and Plymouth)
Senator Patricia D. Jehlen (D-2nd Middlesex)
Senator Patrick O’Connor (R-Plymouth and Norfolk)
Senator Richard Ross (R-Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex)
Senator Ryan Fattman (R-Worcester and Norfolk)
Senator Sal DiDomenico (D-Middlesex and Suffolk)
Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz (D-2nd Suffolk)
Senator Stanley Rosenberg (D-Hampshire and Franklin and Worcester)
Senator Vinny deMacedo (R-Plymouth and Barnstable)
Senator Walter Timilty (D-Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth)

Make just four calls to move forward workplace anti-bullying legislation

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The Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development heard our testimony in support of Senate Bill 1013, the Healthy Workplace Bill, on April 4. Now it’s time to urge them to move it forward.

We ask you to call these four committee leaders even if you’ve called them before. Tell the person who answers the phone:

“I’m calling to support Senate Bill 1013, an act addressing workplace bullying, mobbing, and harassment, without regard to protected class. Can you ask the legislator to read Senate Bill 1013 favorably out of committee?”

They will ask your name and address and thank you for calling.

Here are the four committee leaders:
Senator Jason Lewis: 617-722-1206
Senator Pat Jehlen: 617-722-1578
Rep. Paul Brodeur: 617-722-2013
Rep. Tricia Farley-Bouvier: 617-722-2240

It’s that simple!

Since the two committee heads represent the town of Melrose, and legislators care about their constituents’ views to count on future votes, forward this message onto anyone who lives in Melrose.

Everyone in Massachusetts can call these leaders, too. Every call matters.