Tagged: hearing

Another successful hearing to push anti-workplace bullying legislation in Massachusetts

On Tuesday, I joined with other supporters of the Healthy Workplace Bill (HWB) to testify on its behalf at a hearing before the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development of the Massachusetts legislature, held at the State House in Boston. Getting a favorable decision out of the Committee is the first critical step toward […]

via MA State House hearing for Healthy Workplace Bill — Minding the Workplace

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Today is hearing day at the State House to make workplace bullying illegal

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Today’s the day! The Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development will hear our testimony in support of Senate Bill 1013 (the Healthy Workplace Bill) at 1pm in Room A2 of the Massachusetts State House. Keep in mind that the legislators may not get to our bill until late in the afternoon, even as late as 4 or 5pm.
You are invited to attend and even testify to show support. 

We hope to fill the room with advocates to show support for the Healthy Workplace Bill.

At the hearing, legislators listen to testimony about several bills. Last session, legislators waited until the end of the hours-long hearing to listen to testimony from our advocates. We encourage you to speak at the end on behalf of the bill.

Dos and don’ts of speaking at the hearing

DO speak about your experience. Speak from the heart about how workplace bullying affected you, especially how it harmed your health and affected your personal relationships. Remember that legislators want to hear from you.

DO keep your testimony to under two minutes. By the end of the hours-long hearing, legislators may be tired. The last thing we want to do is turn them off, so stick to the facts and to your own experience and keep it brief. It’s difficult to summarize months or years of bullying into two minutes, but it’s important to do so.

DO stick to our talking points. Refresh yourself on the main points we want to get across:

  1. Accountability, not just training, is what will change behavior.
  2. There will be a high threshold for recovery.
  3. The bill is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s definition of a hostile work environment for sexual harassment.
  4. The bill enters the picture only when the bullying behaviors have become severe and harmful.
  5. Employers can minimize their liability exposure by acting preventively and responsively toward bullying.
  6. The bill focuses on addressing the bullying behavior, not killing jobs.
  7. Many workplace bullying targets already lose jobs, choosing their health over daily suffering.

DO visit your state rep and senator that day. Before or after the hearing, stop by your legislators’ offices and ask them to support the Healthy Workplace Bill. That’s one State Rep and one State Senator. Try to make an appointment with them beforehand. If you can only speak with an aide, do that. Aides will pass along information to legislators. The State House is hard to navigate, so write down the State House room numbers before that day, bring them with you, and don’t be afraid to ask someone how to get to those offices. Bring a copy of each of these fact sheets (two of each, one for each legislator) to leave with your legislators:
Fact sheet
Myths sheet

DO email these fact sheets to your legislators if you can’t make it that day. Your legislators want to hear from you.

DON’T mention bully’s names or workplaces — unless asked. The goal is to pass the law, not to out a boss or workplace.

DON’T feel like you have to testify to show support. If you’re not ready to speak under two minutes about your experience, don’t feel obligated to speak. You may not be ready, and that’s ok. Showing your support by attending is much appreciated whether or not you speak.

 

Remember that perseverance is key. Most bills take years to pass, and we’ve come a long way with just 20 advocates six years ago to now more than 8,000. Help become part of history by showing your support and helping to fill the room today.

We have a hearing date to make workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts

State House

We have a hearing date. The Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development will hear our testimony in support of Senate Bill 1013 (the Healthy Workplace Bill) next Tuesday, April 4, at 1pm in Room A2 of the Massachusetts State House.
You are invited to attend and even testify to show support. 

We hope to fill the room with advocates to show support for the Healthy Workplace Bill.

At the hearing, legislators listen to testimony about several bills. Last session, legislators waited until the end of the hours-long hearing to listen to testimony from our advocates. We encourage you to speak at the end on behalf of the bill.

Dos and don’ts of speaking at the hearing

DO speak about your experience. Speak from the heart about how workplace bullying affected you, especially how it harmed your health and affected your personal relationships. Remember that legislators want to hear from you.

DO keep your testimony to under two minutes. By the end of the hours-long hearing, legislators may be tired. The last thing we want to do is turn them off, so stick to the facts and to your own experience and keep it brief. It’s difficult to summarize months or years of bullying into two minutes, but it’s important to do so.

DO stick to our talking points. Refresh yourself on the main points we want to get across:

  1. Accountability, not just training, is what will change behavior.
  2. There will be a high threshold for recovery.
  3. The bill is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s definition of a hostile work environment for sexual harassment.
  4. The bill enters the picture only when the bullying behaviors have become severe and harmful.
  5. Employers can minimize their liability exposure by acting preventively and responsively toward bullying.
  6. The bill focuses on addressing the bullying behavior, not killing jobs.
  7. Many workplace bullying targets already lose jobs, choosing their health over daily suffering.

DO visit your state rep and senator that day. Before or after the hearing, stop by your legislators’ offices and ask them to support the Healthy Workplace Bill. That’s one State Rep and one State Senator. Try to make an appointment with them beforehand. If you can only speak with an aide, do that. Aides will pass along information to legislators. The State House is hard to navigate, so write down the State House room numbers before that day, bring them with you, and don’t be afraid to ask someone how to get to those offices. Bring a copy of each of these fact sheets (two of each, one for each legislator) to leave with your legislators:
Fact sheet
Myths sheet

DO email these fact sheets to your legislators if you can’t make it that day. Your legislators want to hear from you.

DON’T mention bully’s names or workplaces — unless asked. The goal is to pass the law, not to out a boss or workplace.

DON’T feel like you have to testify to show support. If you’re not ready to speak under two minutes about your experience, don’t feel obligated to speak. You may not be ready, and that’s ok. Showing your support by attending is much appreciated whether or not you speak.

Remember that perseverance is key. Most bills take years to pass, and we’ve come a long way with just 20 advocates six years ago to now more than 5,000. Help become part of history by showing your support and helping to fill the room on Tuesday, April 4.

We have a hearing date

We now have a hearing date for the first step in getting the Healthy Workplace Bill passed this legislative session. Mark your calendars for next Tuesday, July 21 at the State House, time and room to be decided. (Check back on the Joint Committee for Labor and Workforce Development page on the Hearings tab for a time and location update.)

We need your help

We hope to fill the room with advocates to show support for the Healthy Workplace Bill. If you can take the day off and attend, join us to show your support. We have an official panel lined up but still encourage your presence and testimony at the end of the hearing.

At the hearing. legislators listen to testimony about several bills. Last session, most attendees in the room appeared in support of the Healthy Workplace Bill, so legislators waited until the end of the hours-long hearing to listen to testimony from our advocates. We encourage you to speak at the end on behalf of the bill.

Dos and don’ts of speaking at the hearing

DO speak about your experience. Speak from the heart about how workplace bullying affected you, especially how it harmed your health and affected your personal relationships. Remember that legislators want to hear from you.

DO keep your testimony to under two minutes. By the end of the hours-long hearing, legislators may be tired. The last thing we want to do is turn them off, so stick to the facts and to your own experience and keep it brief. It’s difficult to summarize months or years of bullying into two minutes, but it’s important to do so.

DO stick to our talking points. Refresh yourself on the main points we want to get across:

  1. Accountability, not just training, is what will change behavior.
  2. There will be a high threshold for recovery.
  3. The bill is based on the U.S. Supreme Court’s definition of a hostile work environment for sexual harassment.
  4. The bill enters the picture only when the bullying behaviors have become severe and harmful.
  5. Employers can minimize their liability exposure by acting preventively and responsively toward bullying.
  6. The bill focuses on addressing the bullying behavior, not killing jobs.
  7. Many workplace bullying targets already lose jobs, choosing their health over daily suffering.

DO visit your state rep and senator that day. Before or after the hearing, stop by your legislators’ offices and ask them to support the Healthy Workplace Bill. That’s one state rep and one state senator. Try to make an appointment with them beforehand. If you can only speak with an aide, do that. Aides will pass along information to legislators. The State House is hard to navigate, so write down the State House room numbers before that day, bring them with you, and don’t be afraid to ask someone how to get to those offices. Bring a copy of each of these fact sheets (two of each, one for each legislator) to leave with your legislators:
Fact sheet
Myths sheet

DO email these fact sheets to your legislators if you can’t make it that day. Your legislators want to hear from you.

DON’T mention bully’s names or workplaces — unless asked. The goal is to pass the law, not to out a boss or workplace.

DON’T feel like you have to testify to show support. If you’re not ready to speak under two minutes about your experience, don’t feel obligated to speak. You may not be ready, and that’s ok. Showing your support by attending is much appreciated whether or not you speak.

Remember that perseverance is key. Most bills take years to pass, and we’ve come a long way with just 20 advocates five years ago to now more than 5,000. Help become part of history by showing your support and helping to fill the room on Tuesday, July 21.

Get ready for 2015

We’re gearing up for the next legislative session that starts in January. We’ll start from the beginning of the process but building on the momentum we’ve gained in the last two sessions.

We need your help

We’re looking for stories about how you were treated at work and for people to testify at the hearing next session in 2015. Email 1-2 pages of how you were bullied at work and why you want the Healthy Workplace Bill to pass by October 31 to gsorozan@nage.org. If you’d also like to testify, include that in your email. If you have poetry or another creative work regarding workplace bullying, send that off as well.

What I learned from last week’s hearing

1. We’re quickly gaining momentum. Last session, two years ago, few testified at the hearing. We had 13 sponsors then. This session, more than 12 testified. More mentioned support for the bill. We have 39 sponsors now. Major news outlets continue to pick up our story.

2. Our arguments are reasonable and solid. Our information comes from experts who have studied workplace abuse. Our stories are real. We know that accountability is the solution based on our knowledge of workplace abuse.

3. Our legislators are thorough and compassionate. Our legislators want to understand the issue as much as possible and from all sides. They want to hear our stories. They want to do the right thing.

What were your takeaways from last week’s hearing?

Find out how the Healthy Workplace Bill hearing went

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Our hearing in front of the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development at the State House today went incredibly well. Supporting testimony came from:

  • Our panel comprised of co-coordinator Greg Sorozan, president of NAGE Local 282 whose lobbyists push the bill at the State House for us, bill author and Suffolk law professor David Yamada, and advocate Susan.
  • Lead sponsors Rep. Ellen Story and Sen. Katherine Clark and other legislators.
  • Roughly 12 advocates who bravely told their stories and provided insight into why we need a law.

Special thanks to Greg Sorozan and NAGE for leading the hearing efforts and for compiling written testimony for the committee.

We thank you for your hard work in getting us to this point. We’re grown tremendously since the last session thanks to your efforts in spreading the word.

LEGISLATIVE ACTION: Send an e-mail to the committee members from today (even if you were unable to attend) thanking them for listening to our testimony, referring them to our website http://www.mahealthyworkplace.com for more information, and sending them to this link for myths on the bill: http://www.mahealthyworkplace.com/MAWorkplaceBullyingFactSheet3.pdf

Committee members by district (let them know if you live in one of their districts):
Sen. Daniel Wolf (D), Chair, Harwich, Daniel.Wolf@masenate.gov
Rep. Thomas Conroy (D), Chair, Wayland, Thomas.Conroy@mahouse.gov

Sen. Michael Barrett (D), Lexington, Mike.Barrett@masenate.gov
Sen. Barry Finegold (D), Andover, Barry.Finegold@MASenate.gov
Sen. Robert Hedlund (R), Weymouth, Robert.Hedlund@masenate.gov
Sen. Michael Moore (D), Millbury, Michael.Moore@masenate.gov
Sen. Michael Rush (D), West Roxbury, Mike.Rush@masenate.gov

Rep. Lori Ehrlich (D), Marblehead, Lori.Ehrlich@mahouse.gov
Rep. Denise Andrew (D), Orange, Denise.Andrews@mahouse.gov
Rep. Nicholas Boldyga (R), Southwick, Nicholas.Boldyga@mahouse.gov
Rep. Ken Gordon (D), Bedford, Ken.Gordon@mahouse.gov
Rep. Mary Keefe, (D), Worcester, Mary.Keefe@mahouse.gov
Rep. Wayne Matewsky (D), Everett, Wayne.Matewsky@mahouse.gov
Rep. Keiko Orrall (R), Lakeville, Keiko.Orrall@mahouse.gov
Rep. Angelo Puppolo Jr. (D), Springfield, Angelo.Puppolo@mahouse.gov
Rep. John Rogers (D), Norwood, John.Rogers@mahouse.gov

E-mail addresses only to copy and paste:
Daniel.Wolf@masenate.gov, Thomas.Conroy@mahouse.gov, Mike.Barrett@masenate.gov, Barry.Finegold@MASenate.gov, Robert.Hedlund@masenate.gov, Michael.Moore@masenate.gov, Mike.Rush@masenate.gov, Lori.Ehrlich@mahouse.gov, Denise.Andrews@mahouse.gov, Nicholas.Boldyga@mahouse.gov, Ken.Gordon@mahouse.gov, Mary.Keefe@mahouse.gov, Wayne.Matewsky@mahouse.gov, Keiko.Orrall@mahouse.gov, Angelo.Puppolo@mahouse.gov, John.Rogers@mahouse.gov