Tagged: massachusetts

URGENT: Tomorrow is the last day of the legislative session to make workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts

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While the workplace anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill, Senate Bill 1013, is still in Senate Ways & Means, we can take these last two days of the legislative session — today and tomorrow — to drive home the point that workplace bullying ruins lives and businesses.

How you can help

Senator Karen Spilka has recently become Senate President, so call Senate Ways & Means Vice Chair Joan Lovely at 617-722-1410 and tell whoever answers the phone that you support Senate Bill 1013 regarding workplace bullying. Phone calls are disruptive, so the more calls we make, the more she’ll take notice.

The goal of these calls is to keep the bill on leaders’ radar for the next session.

We thank you for your continued support of this bill. The bill couldn’t have made it this far without your phone calls and understanding that this effort is long-term. Remember that most bills take several years to pass. This bill is no exception. We’ve spent the last several years building a base of support for this legislation, and we won’t stop building that base until this bill gets passed. In the next several days, we’ll reach out to you with our fall plans to take this campaign to the next level — and how you can help bring protections for thousands of workers who need our help.

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We have exactly two weeks left in the legislative session to make workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts

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We’re still waiting for Senator Karen Spilka to take action on much-needed workplace anti-bullying legislation. And there are only two weeks left in the legislative session. Meanwhile, workplace bullying is wreaking havoc on lives and businesses.

Workplace anti-bullying legislation is the furthest it’s gone in the Massachusetts Legislature, and the two-year legislative session ends July 31. We start over again in January if the bill does not pass. The bill, Senate Bill 1013, is now in Senate Ways & Means and needs to get to a floor vote ASAP.

The bill competes for attention with the budget and a role transition, so we need as many people as possible to call again to get attention in Senator Spilka’s office.

How you can help (in order of effectiveness)

Option 1: Meet with Senate Ways & Means Chair Karen Spilka by emailing her scheduler Rachel Lefsky at rachel.lefsky@masenate.gov. (If Rachel doesn’t get back to you, followup at 617-722-1640.) Ask Rachel if you can setup a meeting with Senator Spilka ASAP and let Senator Spilka know why you want workplace anti-bullying legislation to pass. Bring these fact sheets with you to the meeting:
Fact Sheet #1
Fact Sheet #2

Option 2: Even if you’ve called her before, call Senator Karen Spilka ASAP at 617-722-1640 and ask whoever answers the phone to urge Senator Spilka to move Senate Bill 1013 regarding workplace bullying to a floor vote. Phone calls are disruptive, so the more calls we make, the more she’ll take notice.

Option 3: Call your own legislator and ask whoever answers the phone if your legislator can write a letter to Senator Spilka or speak with her about moving the workplace anti-bullying Senate Bill 1013 to a floor vote ASAP.

Option 4: Call all members of Senate Ways & Means and ask those who answer the phone if the legislator can help move the workplace anti-bullying Senate Bill 1013 to a floor vote ASAP.

If you can do two, three, or all options, even better.

And please spread the word. It will help save lives.

Want to spread the word? Forward this email or download the flyer.

Learn about what workplace bullying is »
Like us on Facebook »

PS – Did you see the bill in the news recently? It made:
The front page of the Boston Globe
The LA Times
Truthout

URGENT: Make this one call to make workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts to prevent another loss of life

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Longtime Advocate Gail lost her son Jae on June 7 as a result of workplace bullying at a hospital on Cape Cod that included physical threats, assault, and false accusations. Though the abuse happened a few years ago, it followed Jae. Jae recently spoke with Gail about the abuse and how it affected his life. He worked in fear of being attacked again. “Jason was an incredible nurse. Any and all who had him as a nurse spoke with such respect and love about him. Despite the time that goes by, the emotional damage remains and continues to wreak havoc,” said Gail.

We need everyone’s voices to make sure what happened to Jae happens to NO ONE ELSE. Bullied workers are twice as likely to take their lives as non-bullied workers.

Workplace anti-bullying legislation is the furthest it’s gone in the Massachusetts Legislature, and the two-year legislative session ends July 31. We start over again in January if the bill does not pass, so now is the time to act. The bill, Senate Bill 1013, is now in Senate Ways & Means and needs to get to a floor vote ASAP.

Here’s how you can help

Call Senate Ways & Means Chair Karen Spilka ASAP — even if you’ve called her before — at 617-722-1640. Ask whoever answers the phone to urge Senator Spilka to move Senate Bill 1013 regarding workplace bullying to a floor vote.

And spread the word. For Jae.

What who’s in Senate leadership means for workplace bullying legislation

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For the first time ever, Massachusetts Senate Ways & Means is led by all women. And with women more like to be bullied at work according to the Workplace Bullying Institute, timing couldn’t be better to get workplace anti-bullying legislation through the Senate, making it the furthest the bill would ever get in the Massachusetts State House.

We need your help to get there. With less than two months in the legislative session, which ends July 31, we ask you to help keep pressure on Senate Ways & Means to move Senate Bill 1013 to a vote in the Senate. 

We ask you to make these four calls TODAY:

  1. Call these Senators and ask whoever answers the phone if the Senator will make Senate Bill 1013 a priority to make severe cases of workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts:
    Senator Karen Spilka (Chair), 617-722-1640
    Senator Joan Lovely (Vice Chair), 617-722-1410
    Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz (Assistant Vice Chair), 617-722-1673
  2. Ask your own State Senator via phone or email to write to Chairwoman Karen Spilka asking her to bring the Senate Bill 1013 to a floor vote.
You can also:
  • Post on Facebook and tweet using #ItStartsWithUs #WorkplaceBullying #mapoli to keep the conversation going and to increase awareness of the problem. You can tweet at these Senators using @KarenSpilka @SenJoanLovely @SoniaChangDiaz @BarrettSenate @wbrownsberger @VinnyDeMacedo @SalDiDomenico @JamieEldridgeMA @adamghinds @SenDonHumason @senjehlen @SenJohnFKeenan @SenMikeMoore @KOconnorIves @SenRichardJRoss @SenatorMikeRush @Sen_Jim_Welch
  • Repost our Facebook and Twitter posts.

Want to spread the word? Forward this email or download the flyer.

Your calls to ask for support for workplace anti-bullying legislation are working

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Your calls to your Massachusetts State Senators are working. In the last few days, these 12 senators signed onto Senator Paul Feeney’s Senate Budget Amendment #23 to make severe cases of workplace bullying illegal in Massachusetts (including Senator Paul Feeney, that’s more than one third of the entire State Senate). Note the six supporters who’ve never signed onto this bill in the past, including two Republicans, all thanks to your efforts:

Senator William N. Brownsberger (D-Boston)
Senator Julian Cyr (D-Cape and Islands)
Senator Sal DiDomenico (D-Middlesex and Suffolk)
Senator James Eldridge (D-Acton)
Senator Ryan Fattman (R-Worcester and Norfolk)
Senator Cindy Friedman (D-4th Middlesex)
Senator Anne Gobi (D-Worcester, Hampden, Hampshire and Middlesex)
Senator Barbara L’Italien (D-Andover)
Senator Michael O. Moore (D-Shrewsbury)
Senator Patrick O’Connor (R-Plymouth and Norfolk)
Senator Walter Timilty (D-Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth)
Senator James T. Welch (D-Hampden)

If your State Senator is listed above, we have your Senator’s official support.

Here’s who’s left to urge to sign onto this amendment:

Senator Michael J. Barrett (D-3rd Middlesex)
Senator Joseph A. Boncore (D-1st Suffolk and Middlesex)
Senator Michael Brady (D-Brockton)*
Senator Harriette Chandler (D-1st Worcester)
Senator Sonia Chang-Diaz (D-2nd Suffolk)*
Senator Nick Collins (D-Boston)
Senator Cynthia Stone Creem (D-1st Middlesex and Norfolk)
Senator Brendan Crighton (D-Lynn)
Senator Vinny deMacedo (R-Plymouth and Barnstable)
Senator Adam G. Hinds (D-Berkshire, Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden)
Senator Donald F. Humason, Jr. (R-Westfield)*
Senator Patricia D. Jehlen (D-2nd Middlesex)
Senator John Keenan (D-Norfolk and Plymouth)
Senator Eric Lesser (D-1st Hampden and Hampshire)
Senator Jason Lewis (D-5th Middlesex)
Senator Joan B. Lovely (D-Peabody)*
Senator Mark Montigny (D-2nd Bristol and Plymouth)
Senator Kathleen O’Connor Ives (D-1st Essex)
Senator Marc Pacheco (D-1st Plymouth and Bristol)
Senator Michael Rodrigues (D-1st Bristol and Plymouth)
Senator Richard Ross (R-Norfolk, Bristol and Middlesex)
Senator Michael F. Rush (D-Norfolk and Suffolk)
Senator Karen Spilka (D-2nd Middlesex and Norfolk)
Senator Bruce Tarr (R-1st Essex and Middlesex)
Senator Dean Tran (R-Worcester and Middlesex)

*Denotes past co-sponsor.
Here’s how you can help

It’s up to each of us to ensure protections for employees who will go through the torment at work we went through. We need your help to create a groundswell throughout every part of the Commonwealth to say STOP to bullying at work.

For those who’ve contacted your legislators about this bill, we thank you and ask you to take action again by making this specific request.

Respectful and dignified work environments start at the top. #ItStartsWithUs

PS — Join the Senate budget discussion online by using #SenBudget on Facebook and Twitter showing your support of Senate Budget Amendment #23 to make severe cases of workplace bullying illegal. Watch the feed while Senate budget discussions happen.

Want to spread the word? Forward this email or download the flyer.

Learn about what workplace bullying is »
Like us on Facebook »

PS – Did you see the bill in the news recently? It made:
The front page of the Boston Globe
The LA Times
Truthout

With workplace bullying in the Senate, it’s time for Massachusetts legislators to take a stand

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The Senate Committee on Ethics on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 released its report concerning Senator Stanley C. Rosenberg and concluded that Rosenberg had ample evidence of workplace harassment but failed to remedy it for those who depended on him: his own staff, his fellow Senators and their staff, and ultimately his constituents, Commonwealth employees, and the people of the Commonwealth. Had workplace bullying without regard to protected class been illegal, Senate staff could have had clear and safe recourse to protect themselves from Rosenberg’s negligence that emboldened his husband’s toxic behavior — leading ultimately to threats, racial comments, sexual harassment, sexual assault, and costs to taxpayers through a thorough investigation.

Given legal protections from workplace bullying, staff would have been able to seek help when Rosenberg:

  • Failed to uphold the IT policy he didn’t read by giving his husband, who exhibited bullying behavior, full access to his email account — and asking his staff to do the same even when they expressed discomfort.
  • Excused his husband’s bullying behavior as “mental health issues” once he was aware of the harassment and concerned about where it might lead.
  • Emboldened the bullying behavior by continuing to inform his husband of Senate matters despite his husband’s prior harassment of staff.

Workplace bullying occurs in workplace cultures where leadership at the top allows it to happen. Rosenberg supported a bully culture by:

  • Exempting himself from Senate policies.
  • Failing to protect staff by excusing unethical and dangerous behavior.
  • Continuing to give a known bully access to tools that furthered his bullying.
  • Failing to implement a workplace bullying policy and to empower Human Resource staff to uphold it.

Had workplace bullying been illegal, Rosenberg’s staff could have felt safe to do their jobs in a respectful and dignified work environment. They would have had a clear and safe path to report violations of a workplace bullying policy and would have likely prevented Rosenberg’s husband from escalating his abusive behavior.

Now that they know their own policies fail to create a workplace free from harassment and its destructive consequences, Senators can:

In the words of the Senate Committee on Ethics, when leaders have evidence and fail to act in support of those who depend on them, “the most obvious sanction for a failure of leadership would be the loss of the relevant leadership position.”

Respectful and dignified work environments start at the top.

#ItStartsWithUs

Workplace anti-bullying legislation takes a step forward in Massachusetts

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We’ve recently received word that the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development gave the workplace anti-bullying Healthy Workplace Bill, Senate Bill 1013, a favorable report. Since the bill is a Senate Bill this session, the bill moves to the Senate instead of the House, where it landed in past sessions.

Five months left

We only have five months remaining in this two-year session, which means that while we wait to see where in the Senate the bill lands, we encourage you to put the pressure on your State Senators only (once the bill moves to the House, we’ll put pressure on our State Reps again):

  1. Call your State Senator and ask whoever answers the phone for the email address of the scheduler so you can schedule a meeting with your State Senator. 
  2. Email the scheduler to setup a meeting either in local office hours or at the State House as soon as possible. This step is huge. Some of you have asked why we’re not doing more at the State House as a group. Well, the answer is simple: we’re all volunteers trying to push this bill outside of our full-time jobs and other responsibilities, and since our legislators care about getting their constituents’ votes in the next election, it’s most effective for us individually to meet with our own legislators one-on-one when it’s convenient for us. We’ve learned major insights from advocates after meetings with their legislators. Showing up as a group to legislators’ offices without an appointment simply isn’t as effective.
  3. Bring the flyers listed on this page with you to your meeting and summarize your workplace bullying story with your State Senator. Keep your State Senator armed with the facts, and ask him or her to put urgency on Senate leadership to bring the bill to a floor vote.
  4. Pass insights about their concerns onto us. Email us at info@mahealthyworkplace.com.

It’s up to each of us to make time to ensure protections for employees who will go through the torment at work we went through. We need your help to create a groundswell throughout every part of the Commonwealth to say STOP to bullying at work. For those who’ve met with your legislators, we thank you and ask you to nudge them again while the bill is on their turf.