Tagged: mental health

Workplace bullying is allegedly rampant at tech giant Apple

New study shows that prolonged exposure to workplace bullying can lead to suicide – and it can happen to anyone

Bullying concept in workplace with angry and afraid eggs charact

Researchers have finally found that workplace bullies can drive their targets to suicide. In fact, the study published in the American Journal of Public Health last September revealed that bullied targets are twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts than those who were never bullied. Pioneer Heinz Leymann estimated that 10 percent of those bullied take their lives, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI) article “The very real link between workplace bullying and suicide: Twice as likely to contemplate suicide.”

Researchers defined bullying as harassment, badgering, and freezing out that:

  • Occurred repeatedly over a period of time.
  • Involved two parties in which one had a higher ranking than the other.

It happens so often that there’s now a term for it. “Bullycide” happens when the cause of suicide is attributable to the victim having been bullied.

How workplace bullying can lead any of us to suicide (“bullycide”)

Researchers also tested to see if qualities of workplace bullying targets warranted uninvited psychological assaults. They found nothing: zero data to support reason to blame the victim. In other words, targets are not simply those with exploited weakness.

In fact, evidence shows the opposite. Targets are often high performing, highly ethical employees whose competence poses a threat to their low performing, low ethical bosses. The bully’s only real motivator is to battle the target while having the upper hand – an unethical tactic used to uphold the image they long for but are unable to get through competence:

  • They abuse their power. They care about hurting, manipulating, controlling, and eliminating the target (generally after two years after the employee’s start date). They are kiss up, kick down managers who are masters of deception.
  • They deceive others into thinking the target is the problem. They use the emotional abuse they caused to convince others that the target is mentally ill, setting the stage for mobbing, in which coworkers join in to isolate the target.

A bully’s typical recipe:

  1. The bully initially repeatedly reprimands the better than average target for trivial matters and those that would be described completely differently by the target. The bully repeatedly puts the target down.
  2. The bully convinces others that the target is incompetent, so others can begin to shun the target and unwittingly participate in the emotional abuse.
  3. The bully drives the target to go to report the problem to the bully’s boss or to Human Resources and then escalates the bully behavior.
  4. The bully makes their tactics so outrageous that the target’s support system (family and friends) doesn’t believe the target and can’t offer advice. Then these family and friends become tired of hearing the target obsessively repeat issues that can’t be resolved.
  5. The target is now very much alone and increasingly vulnerable to suicide. Targets try everything and then give up hope. If not stopped, the prolonged abuse causes depression and often suicidal thoughts. “Targets who sense that they’re about to be fired and cannot cope with that eventuality are vulnerable to suicide,” adds reporter Natasha Wallace in her article  “Suicide, When Related to Workplace Bullying.”

“There is a body of research identifying bullied targets as more emotional than others. But anxious personalities are not rare in our society. Witness the prevalence of anti-depressant drugs prescribed,” says WBI.

Our false perceptions of suicide

The public often finds fault with the people who take their lives. And mental health folks rarely understand the severity of abusive conduct at work’s effect on targets’ lives, so they discount the contribution of abuse at work and instead point to family and financial matters as root cause.

But the reality is that workplace bullying can cause a target to abandon hope over time, to not see a future or alternatives. Abuse tactics are often so outrageous that no one believes the target when a bully attacks. They think the target must have done something wrong or exaggerates. Then abandonment by coworkers and impatience of family members and friends lead to utter loneliness and despair. When everything they try fails, they lose all hope. “Bullying causes severe health harm, much more acute than is experienced by those sexually harassed. Anxiety (80%); panic attacks (52%); depression (49%); PTSD diagnosis (30%); suffering intrusive thoughts/flashbacks (50%); sleep disorders (77%); hypertension (59%) to name some of the negative health consequences,” adds the WBI.

These responses are the natural. “Depression is caused by the unremitting abusive conduct. And their lives unravel if it is not stopped…. It is the nature of the human stress response. With prolonged exposure to distress, changes in the brain occur. Thanks to modern neuroscience studies of social phenomena like ostracism, stress, and bullying, we know that atrophy of key areas of the brain impair decision making. Thus, it is highly likely that a brain flooded with steroidal glucocorticoids is not capable of clear, rational thinking. Suicide is the result of the failure to imagine alternatives to one’s current reality,” adds WBI.

All health harm from bullying is attributable to prolonged exposure. “Ending the distress allows the person to recover. The brain literally ‘heals’ thanks to its property of plasticity. Restored gray matter volume brings back lost cognitive abilities — better decision making, optimism, a visualized future,” says WBI.

Though a family won more than $10 million in a private settlement for the bullying of a worker who committed suicide, there is no law to hold bullies legally accountable.

How you can help

  • If you know of a workplace bullying-related suicide, privately share it with us. Email info@mahealthyworkplace.com with the story so we can share the impact of workplace bullying with key decision makers.
  • Call your state legislators. This two-year legislative session ends this summer, and state reps are not making the bill a priority. That’s where you come in. We urgently ask you to contact Chairman of Bills & Third Reading Theodore Speliotis (617-722-2410, Theodore.Speliotis@mahouse.gov) to ask him to release House Bill 1771 for Third Reading. (The Third Reading is a floor vote and the biggest hurdle of the entire process.) It’s just as helpful to also contact your own rep to ask him or her to both support the bill and contact Rep. Speliotis.

If you are considering harming yourself or need immediate assistance, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Help prevent another suicide caused by an incompetent boss.

Legal and mental health resources for workplace bullying targets

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While our focus is to pass anti-workplace bullying legislation, many of you have come to us looking for legal and mental health advice or resources. We have just added to our website:

What resources do you think are missing from the conversation about workplace bullying that would help you?

It’s not just a bill — it’s a movement

7K0A0597At one point in time, it was normal for women not to vote. But advocacy changed the common way of thinking. It wasn’t just a change of law. It was a movement.

While we want the Healthy Workplace Bill passed, we’re also changing the common way of thinking about employees — that employees’ mental well-being matters. We’re not just saying that a bill needs to pass. We’re moving the needle, each one of us, one by one, to say that mental health matters at work. We’ll look back on this movement and think how absurd it is that workplace bullying is allowed — just as we think not allowing women to vote was absurd.

There’s been recent talk and action from experts on the Healthy Workplace Bill to take the issue to an anti-workplace bullying movement level.

The vision
Imagine workplaces based on mutual respect. Places where people can contribute and feel valued and important. Where workplace bullying isn’t acceptable, but growth and support are. How do we get there? What might the roadmap look like?

Let’s take a look at other social ills: murder, rape, domestic violence. At first we deemed these problems to be problems, then made them illegal. We looked at how to help victims and families of victims. Then the conversation went deeper. We started asking more questions: how do murderers become murderers? What motivates a domestic abuser? How do we prevent crimes from happening in the first place? Aside from accountability through law, what tools do we need? Here is a possible next step in the road toward healthier workplaces:

Analysis of the bully AND the target. We have insights about what types of people get bullied at work: highly competent and highly ethical. Maybe even those who had a bullying parent. But what about the bully? Is it simply insecurity that causes bullying? Or psychopathic tendencies? Or family modeling? Or a combination? More research can help us understand both the target and the bully and move the conversation from mostly how to deal with a workplace bully to more on what makes a workplace bully and how to prevent it.

What are your ideas for the next step in the healthy workplace vision?